California Watch: Barry Bonds http://californiawatch.org/project/barry-bonds/feed en Barry Bonds put on probation in BALCO steroids case http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/barry-bonds-put-probation-balco-steroids-case-14133 <p>Barry Bonds, holder of baseball&rsquo;s career home run record and former San Francisco Giants superstar, was put on probation today for obstructing justice in the BALCO steroids scandal.</p><p>U.S. District Judge Susan Illston rejected a plea by federal prosecutors to punish Bonds with a 15-month prison term on his felony conviction for obstruction of justice. She also agreed to postpone imposing the sentence pending appeal.</p><p>In April, the former slugger was found guilty of equivocating under oath about his use of banned drugs in 2003 testimony before a federal grand jury. In Bonds&rsquo; trial, the jury deadlocked on three perjury charges. Bonds&rsquo; lawyers have said they would appeal his conviction.</p><p>Bonds declined to speak at the hearing. He listened impassively as the judge read the sentence.</p><p>The judge put Bonds on two years&#39; probation. She ordered 30 days of electronic monitoring and restricted him to his Beverly Hills home for that time. He also was ordered to perform 250 hours of community service with youth programs and fined $4,000.</p><p>&quot;I think the jury got it exactly right,&quot; the judge said of the verdict. &quot;Mr. Bonds did make an effort to obstruct justice here, but he didn&rsquo;t succeed.&quot; Despite Bonds&#39; evasive testimony, federal investigators managed to take down the steroid ring centered at the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative in Burlingame, convicting the drug dealers.</p><p>Sports leagues also cracked down on steroid use, she noted, and the nation was educated on the issue of performance-enhancing drugs.</p><p>&quot;To the extent that was the point&quot; of the BALCO probe, &quot;that point has been has been carried out over and over again,&quot; she said.</p><p>Earlier, prosecutor Matt Parrella described Bonds as &quot;unrepentant and unapologetic&quot; and said he had taken steroids for years, &quot;made a lot of money from it&quot; and lied about what he was doing. He urged Illston to impose a prison term.</p><p>The sentencing hearing at federal court in San Francisco brought an anticlimactic end to the federal investigation into steroid-dealing at BALCO.&nbsp;The drug lab supplied steroids designed to beat state-of-the-art drug tests. More than 30 elite athletes in baseball, Olympic track and field, and NFL football became customers, court records show.</p><p>Nationwide, most defendants who are convicted of obstruction of justice in federal court serve some prison time, said New York lawyer Patrick Mullin, a federal sentencing expert.&nbsp;But in the long-running probe of BALCO, easy sentences have been the rule.</p><p>Victor Conte, BALCO&rsquo;s proprietor and mastermind of the conspiracy to corrupt sports with undetectable steroids, was sentenced to four months in prison via a government plea agreement.</p><p>Three other sports figures convicted of lying about their involvement with BALCO drugs &ndash; former San Francisco 49ers lineman Dana Stubblefield, elite track coach Trevor Graham and bicycle racer Tammy Thomas &ndash; avoided prison.</p><p>Greg Anderson, Bonds&rsquo; weight trainer and his reputed steroid supplier, served more than a year in prison. But most of that sentence was for contempt of court after Anderson refused to testify about Bonds and drugs.</p><p>Although Bonds<strong>&nbsp;</strong>avoided prison, his association with BALCO left him with a felony conviction and a reputation as a drug cheat.</p><p>His induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame &ndash; once a foregone conclusion, given that the home run record is the most hallowed in the sport &ndash; is now problematic, said former baseball commissioner Fay Vincent.</p><p>Bonds&rsquo; name goes on the Hall of Fame ballot next year. Selection is by the Baseball Writers&#39; Association of America.&nbsp;So far, no star implicated in the investigation of steroid use has been inducted.</p><p>&ldquo;My guess is, voters will punish Bonds for a while&rdquo; by refusing to vote him into the hall, Vincent said in a telephone interview.</p><p>&ldquo;But if he were to win his appeal, the amount of time on the punishment will diminish,&rdquo; he said. Vincent said that whether Bonds is ultimately inducted will depend in great part on how baseball comes to view its so-called steroid era &ndash; the 15-year period in which as many as half of active ball players, by some estimates, were using performance-enhancing drugs.</p><p>Vincent said he personally believes that Bonds, despite his enormous skill as a baseball player, should never be admitted to the hall.</p><p>&ldquo;My own view is anybody who took those drugs &ndash; and in my view there&rsquo;s no doubt he took them &ndash; should be disqualified,&quot; Vincent said. &quot;It&rsquo;s a form of cheating and shouldn&rsquo;t be countenanced in any way.&rdquo;</p><p>With Bonds&rsquo; case over, baseball faces yet another trial involving a superstar and banned drugs. Roger Clemens, the former Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees pitcher, is scheduled to go to trial next year on charges of lying to Congress about his use of steroids.</p><p>According to documents and interviews, Bonds started down the road to BALCO in 1998, when St. Louis Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire thrilled the nation by breaking the single-season home run record then held by Roger Maris.</p><p>According to Bonds&#39; former girlfriend, Kimberly Bell, and other people who know him, the prideful Giants star became jealous of McGwire, whom he assumed had used steroids to boost his ability to hit home runs. After the season ended, Bonds began training with Anderson, an acquaintance from the San Carlos Little League who had become a weight trainer and steroid dealer.</p><p>According to documents seized by the government, Anderson supplied Bonds with steroids and human growth hormone. Bonds became far more muscular and hit with more power.</p><p>Before the 2001 season, Anderson introduced Bonds to BALCO, where Conte provided a refined drug regimen. That year, Bonds hit 73 home runs to break McGwire&rsquo;s single-season record.</p><p>By then, BALCO had been targeted by federal drug agents. Agent Jeff Novitzky, a dogged investigator then with the Internal Revenue Service&rsquo;s criminal division, staked out the lab and trailed Anderson from BALCO to the players&rsquo; parking lot at what was then called Pacific Bell Park. At night, he sorted through BALCO&rsquo;s trash, where he found evidence of steroid-dealing. In September 2003, Novitzky led raids on BALCO and Anderson&rsquo;s home, taking away significant evidence of drug use by a long list of elite athletes &ndash; including Bonds, according to the government.</p><p>After the raid, 31 athletes with ties to BALCO were subpoenaed before a federal grand jury, where they were granted immunity from prosecution in exchange for truthful testimony about BALCO and drugs.</p><p>Most subpoenaed athletes confessed to their drug use. But in three hours on the witness stand, Bonds refused to admit that he knowingly used steroids, and when pressed sometimes gave rambling and evasive answers. In response to one steroid-related question, Bonds began an extended monologue in which he described himself as a &ldquo;celebrity child&rdquo; who had been pushed into becoming a baseball player. For that answer, more than seven years later, the jury convicted him of a felony.</p> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds steroids Barry Bonds Fri, 16 Dec 2011 20:07:59 +0000 Lance Williams 14133 at http://californiawatch.org magerleagues/Flickr With Bonds' sentencing, BALCO scandal ends http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-sentencing-balco-scandal-ends-14088 <p>Bicycle racer Tammy Thomas lied to a grand jury about her use of steroids, then fought perjury charges in court. Convicted, she was sentenced to house arrest.</p><p>It was the same story for elite track coach Trevor Graham, who lied to a federal agent trying to unpack the BALCO steroids scandal: Found guilty, he too was put on house arrest.</p><p>Now, tomorrow in San&nbsp;Francisco, the same federal judge who showed mercy to those sports figures must sentence a far more famous athlete convicted of equivocating about banned drugs: Barry Bonds, the former Giants slugger and holder of baseball&rsquo;s career home run record.</p><p>Prosecutors want Bonds <a href="http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/prosecutors-seek-prison-time-barry-bonds-13994" target="_blank">imprisoned for 15 months</a> for dodging a grand jury&rsquo;s questions about his use of designer steroids from the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative.</p><p>Up to now, Judge Susan Illston has balked at imprisoning athletes for lying about banned drugs.</p><p>If she is consistent, Bonds also will avoid prison on his <a href="http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-guilty-obstruction-justice-jury-deadlocked-perjury-counts-9792" target="_blank">conviction</a> for obstruction of justice, said New York defense lawyer Patrick Mullin, an expert on federal sentencing issues. But by law, &ldquo;she has no obligation to be consistent &ndash; (sentencing) is a case-by-case situation,&rdquo; he said in an interview.</p><p>Nationwide, more than half of the defendants convicted of obstruction of justice in federal court serve some prison time, Mullin said, citing U.S. Sentencing Commission data.</p><p>Peter Keane, a Golden Gate University law school professor who has followed the case, said the judge might find important differences between Bonds and the other defendants who lied about using BALCO drugs.</p><p>He called Thomas and Graham &ldquo;hapless characters,&rdquo; neither wealthy nor powerful, whose careers were ruined by felony convictions: Graham, former coach of Marion Jones and other Olympic stars, is banned from track, and Thomas, a law school graduate, cannot get a law license.</p><p>But Bonds was the &ldquo;big enchilada&rdquo; of BALCO, Keane said &ndash; a multimillionaire celebrity sports star who used banned drugs to set a hallowed record and then misled a grand jury about what he had done.</p><p>&ldquo;You are talking about someone intentionally throwing a monkey wrench into the gears of the criminal justice system,&rdquo; Keane said.</p><p>The judge might conclude that a prison term for Bonds would remind future prospective grand jury witnesses that &ldquo;they are going to face some penalties&rdquo; if they lie under oath, he said.</p><p>Whatever Illston decides, Bonds&rsquo; sentencing marks the end of the BALCO scandal, eight years after the Giants slugger and 31 other elite athletes were summoned before a grand jury and questioned about their ties to what was then a little-known Burlingame steroid mill.</p><p>At its core, BALCO was a conspiracy to corrupt elite sports with performance-enhancing drugs that had been designed to beat drug tests.</p><p>In addition to Bonds, its famous customers included Jones, winner of three gold medals at the 2000 Olympics; NFL linebacker Bill Romanowski, a four-time Super Bowl champion; and American League Most Valuable Player Jason Giambi, the former Oakland Athletics star.</p><p>Most athletes told the grand jury the truth about their use of banned drugs. Eventually, those who didn&rsquo;t were prosecuted.</p><p>Bonds was indicted on perjury and obstruction charges in 2007, months after he set the home run record in his last season as a Giant. In April, after a three-week trial, he was convicted of obstruction, with the jury deadlocking on perjury charges.</p><p>The federal takedown of BALCO led to many reforms, including toughened steroid testing programs, harsher penalties for steroid dealing, and new drug education programs in schools.</p><p>But from the start, punishments for the people caught up in BALCO have not been severe.</p><p>Victor Conte, the mastermind of the BALCO drug conspiracy, pleaded guilty to steroid dealing and served four months in a federal work camp. Then-U.S. Attorney Kevin Ryan said the law didn&rsquo;t allow a longer sentence.</p><p>Patrick Arnold, the chemist who pleaded guilty to creating the designer steroid called &ldquo;the clear,&rdquo; served three months.</p><p>Greg Anderson, Bonds&rsquo; weight trainer, spent more than a year behind bars, but most of that was for contempt of court because he refused to testify about Bonds and steroids. His sentence for steroid dealing was three months.</p><p>Those defendants were sentenced by Judge Illston, who presided over most BALCO cases. Defendants who drew another judge have fared worse.</p><p>Jones, the Olympic superstar, was prosecuted in New York for lying to investigators about her use of BALCO steroids and for her role in an unrelated check forgery scheme. She was sentenced to six months in prison. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s wrong to cheat and to lie about the cheating,&rdquo; Judge Kenneth Karas told her.</p><p>The toughest BALCO sentence was served by Troy Ellerman, lawyer for BALCO Vice President James Valente. He pleaded guilty to leaking grand jury documents to San Francisco Chronicle reporters for news stories. U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White sentenced him to 30 months.</p><p>Michael Cardoza, a Walnut Creek lawyer who represented several prosecution witnesses in the Bonds case, said the former ballplayer already has been punished severely by the damage BALCO has wrought on his reputation.</p><p>Bonds was one of the greatest baseball players of his era, but the trial showed he was a drug cheat.</p><p>That has &ldquo;gravely affected his ability to get into (baseball&rsquo;s) Hall of Fame,&rdquo; Cardoza said. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t believe he will see the hall in his lifetime, because he used steroids to reach a lot of the records he broke. &hellip; That is the biggest punishment there could be for Barry Bonds. I believe if he could trade the hall for jail time, he would take that trade.&rdquo;</p> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds Marion Jones perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 15 Dec 2011 08:05:04 +0000 Lance Williams 14088 at http://californiawatch.org artalog/Flickr Prosecutors seek prison time for Barry Bonds http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/prosecutors-seek-prison-time-barry-bonds-13994 <p>Federal prosecutors want former San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds to serve 15 months in prison for obstructing their probe into the BALCO steroids scandal.</p><p>In documents filed late yesterday, the legal team that prosecuted baseball&rsquo;s home run king urged Judge Susan Illston to reject the recommendation of a probation officer who said Bonds should be sentenced <a href="http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-should-not-serve-prison-time-probation-officer-says-13934" target="_blank">only to community service</a>.</p><p>After a three-week trial in April, the retired baseball star was convicted of obstruction of justice for giving evasive answers to a grand jury that was probing steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative in Burlingame. <a href="http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-guilty-obstruction-justice-jury-deadlocked-perjury-counts-9792" target="_blank">The jury deadlocked</a> on charges that Bonds lied under oath when he denied that he used steroids and other banned drugs. Sentencing is set for next Friday in U.S. District Court in San Francisco.</p><p>In their filing, the prosecutors said Bonds&rsquo; offense was too serious to merit what the probation officer suggested &ndash; probation with community service.</p><p>When Bonds testified before the BALCO grand jury in 2003, he intended to &ldquo;obfuscate and distract the grand jury from its role in getting to the truth,&rdquo; they wrote.</p><p>&ldquo;His answers that he did not know he was taking steroids and human growth hormone were patently false, and the United States&rsquo; allegation that he lied when he said he had not been injected by anyone other than a doctor was proven at trial through the testimony of Kathy Hoskins.&rdquo;</p><p>At the trial, Hoskins, Bonds&rsquo; former personal shopper, said she saw Greg Anderson, Bonds&rsquo; weight trainer and a confessed steroid dealer, <a href="http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-ex-personal-shopper-says-she-saw-injection-9561" target="_blank">inject the baseball star</a> in the navel. The jury deadlocked 11 to 1 in favor of convicting Bonds of perjury for that testimony.</p><p>In their pleading, the government acknowledged that the judge had granted probation to three other sports figures for lying about steroids in the BALCO case: bicycle racer Tammy Thomas, elite track coach Trevor Graham and former NFL lineman Dana Stubblefield.</p><p>But the government argued that Bonds&rsquo; conduct was more serious, and his case more similar to two other BALCO defendants: Olympic star Marion Jones, who was sentenced to six months in prison for lying about her use of banned drugs and her participation in an unrelated check forgery scheme, and defense lawyer Troy Ellerman, who confessed to providing San Francisco Chronicle reporters with sealed grand jury testimony that became the basis for news stories. Ellerman was sentenced to 30 months in prison, the most meted out to any defendant in the BALCO case.</p><p>Like Jones and Ellerman, Bonds should go to prison, the prosecutors argued.</p><p>&ldquo;Bonds&rsquo; efforts were a corrupt, intentional effort to interfere&rdquo; with the BALCO probe, they wrote, and should be punished with 15 months in prison.</p><p>Bonds holds baseball&rsquo;s single-season and career records for home runs. He was indicted after the 2007 season and hasn&rsquo;t played since.</p> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Fri, 09 Dec 2011 15:43:45 +0000 Lance Williams 13994 at http://californiawatch.org U.S. District Court Bonds should not serve prison time, probation officer says http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-should-not-serve-prison-time-probation-officer-says-13934 <p>A federal probation officer says former San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds should not be required to serve prison time for his conviction on a charge of obstruction of justice, Bonds&rsquo; lawyer revealed in a filing today.</p><p>Bonds was found guilty in April for evading a federal grand jury&rsquo;s questions about his use of steroids and other banned drugs from the BALCO drug lab.</p><p>His jury deadlocked on three perjury charges. Sentencing is set for Dec. 16, and by law, Bonds could face more than two years in prison.</p><p>But after a pretrial investigation, a probation officer concluded that Bonds&rsquo; &ldquo;illegal and criminal&rdquo; behavior&nbsp; appeared to be &ldquo;an aberration when taken in context of his entire life,&rdquo; defense lawyer Allen Ruby wrote, quoting from the report. The report itself is not public.</p><p>The probation officer also opined that Bonds&rsquo; sentence should not take into account Bonds&rsquo; &ldquo;steroid use and how this use impacts his stature&rdquo; as a ball player, Ruby wrote, quoting from the document, but should focus on the crime for which he actually was convicted.</p><p>Rather than a prison term, the probation officer suggested that Bonds be sentenced to community service, especially with young people.</p><p>&ldquo;It is believed Mr. Bonds can use his status, as well as his past record of giving to youth-related causes for some beneficial and significant impact to society,&rdquo; the probation officer wrote, by the defense lawyer&rsquo;s account.</p><p>U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston may consider the probation officer&rsquo;s recommendation before imposing a sentence. Prosecutors have not yet expressed an opinion on Bonds&rsquo; sentence.</p><p>Bonds, who holds baseball&rsquo;s career and single-season home run records, was the most prominent sports star caught up in the steroids scandal centered at the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative in Burlingame. On Dec. 4, 2003, Bonds testified before a grand jury that was investigating the BALCO steroids ring.</p><p>Bonds testified that he had never knowingly used banned drugs and said his trainer, confessed steroid dealer Greg Anderson, had supplied him only with flaxseed oil and arthritis cream &ndash; not the BALCO designer steroids &ldquo;the clear&rdquo; and &ldquo;the cream.&rdquo;</p><p>Prosecutors said Bonds repeatedly lied during the testimony and contended that he sought to deflect and evade the government&rsquo;s questions. Those evasions led to Bonds&rsquo; conviction for obstruction of justice.</p><p>According to the defense lawyer&rsquo;s account, the probation officer cited Bonds&rsquo; &ldquo;history of prior good works&rdquo; as a reason for not imposing a prison term. As a player, Bonds often was criticized for rude and selfish behavior. But his lawyer wrote that Bonds has &ldquo;deliberately chosen not to use the many years he has devoted to causes that he values to enhance his public stature as an athlete and a celebrity.&rdquo;</p><p>The lawyer quoted from a letter written by a Children&#39;s Hospital nurse, who described Bonds as &quot;unfailingly kind and attentive&quot; on his visits to children who are gravely ill.</p><p>The probation officer noted that Illston, the judge, has not imposed a prison term on any other athlete convicted in a BALCO case. In 2008, bicycle racer Tammy Thomas and elite track coach Trevor Graham were convicted of lying about their involvement with performance-enhancing drugs, and both were sentenced to house arrest. Dana Stubblefield, former lineman for the San Francisco 49ers and Oakland Raiders, pleaded guilty to investigators about steroid use and also avoided prison, getting a probation sentence in 2009.</p><p>Former track champion Marion Jones was sentenced in 2008 to six months in prison for two unrelated charges &ndash; lying about her use of BALCO drugs and participating in a check forgery ring. That case was prosecuted in New York.</p> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Wed, 07 Dec 2011 02:19:14 +0000 Lance Williams 13934 at http://californiawatch.org U.S. District Court Bonds won't face retrial on perjury charges http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-wont-face-retrial-perjury-charges-12399 <p>Baseball slugger Barry Bonds will not face a retrial on steroids-related perjury charges.</p><p>Federal prosecutors today dismissed three felony charges of lying under oath to the grand jury that investigated the BALCO steroids scandal. In April, a jury deadlocked on the three counts.</p><p>But the jury convicted Bonds of another felony, obstruction of justice, for giving evasive testimony to the BALCO grand jury. The government contended that Bonds was using banned drugs obtained from his trainer, confessed steroids dealer Greg Anderson, and from the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative steroids lab in Burlingame.</p><p>Bonds is scheduled to be sentenced on the obstruction felony Dec. 16. He could be sentenced to federal prison, though experts believe a term of house arrest is more likely.</p><p>Lead prosecutor Matt Parrella filed the dismissal in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. The dismissal was made &ldquo;without prejudice,&rdquo; meaning the government could change its mind.</p><p>The government had the right to retry Bonds because the jury failed to reach unanimous verdicts on the three counts. In interviews, jurors said they deadlocked 11-1 on a perjury charge involving Bonds&#39; denial that he had ever been injected by anyone other than a physician. Bonds&rsquo; former personal shopper testified in the trial that she saw Anderson give Bonds an injection in the navel. Human growth hormone is injected in the abdomen.</p><p>The jury deadlocked in favor of acquitting Bonds on charges that he lied when he said he had never used steroids or human growth hormone.</p><p><em><b>Correction: </b>This post was updated to correct the fact that the dismissal was made &quot;without prejudice,&quot; meaning the government could still choose to refile the charges</em>.</p> Public Safety Daily Report Barry Bonds perjury steroids Barry Bonds Wed, 31 Aug 2011 22:09:52 +0000 Lance Williams 12399 at http://californiawatch.org artalog/Flickr Judge upholds Barry Bonds' conviction for obstruction http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/judge-upholds-barry-bonds-conviction-obstruction-12326 <p>A federal judge tonight rejected baseball slugger Barry Bonds&rsquo; plea to overturn his felony conviction for obstruction of justice in a trial on steroid-related perjury charges.</p><p>The ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Susan Ilston clears the way for the former San Francisco Giants&rsquo; star&rsquo;s sentencing. He faces a potential term of more than two years in prison, although many experts believe he may only be sentenced to house arrest.</p><p>Bonds, who holds baseball&rsquo;s career record for home runs, was indicted on charges of lying to the federal grand jury that investigated the <a href="http://www.sfgate.com/barrybonds/" target="_blank">BALCO sports steroids scandal</a>. In his 2003 testimony, he denied knowingly using steroids.</p><p>He was charged with lying under oath to the grand jury and with obstructing justice for allegedly interfering with their probe.</p><p>After a two-week trial that ended in April, the jury failed to reach unanimous verdicts on three perjury charges. They deadlocked 11-to-1 in favor of convicting Bonds for lying about receiving an injection from his weight trainer, confessed BALCO steroid dealer Greg Anderson, and they deadlocking in favor of acquittal on two other perjury counts.</p><p>In her ruling, the judge rejected all of Bonds&rsquo; arguments. She wrote: &ldquo;The record supports a finding, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the question was material to the grand jury&rsquo;s investigation of BALCO and Greg Anderson for unlawfully distributing performance enhancing drugs, and that defendant endeavored to obstruct the grand jury by not answering it when it was first asked.&rdquo;</p><p>The judge has not set a sentencing date.</p><p>The jury convicted Bonds of obstruction, saying he had intentionally sought to mislead the grand jury when he gave a rambling answer to a query about whether Anderson had ever provided him with injectable drugs. Bonds ducked the question, responding with a monologue in which he observed that he had been a &ldquo;celebrity child&rdquo; and hadn&rsquo;t chosen to play baseball.</p><p>Bonds had replied:</p><blockquote><p>I&rsquo;ve only had one doctor touch me. And that&rsquo;s my only personal doctor. Greg, like I said, we don&rsquo;t get into each other&#39;s personal lives. We&rsquo;re friends, but I don&rsquo;t &ndash; we don&rsquo;t sit around and talk baseball, because he knows I don&rsquo;t want &ndash; don&rsquo;t come to my house talking baseball.</p><p>If you want to come to my house and talk about fishing, some other stuff, we&rsquo;ll be good friends, you come around talking about baseball, you go on. I don&rsquo;t talk about his business. You know what I mean? &hellip;</p><p>That&rsquo;s what keeps our friendship. You know, I am sorry, but that &ndash; you know, that &ndash; I was a celebrity child, not just in baseball by my own instincts. I became a celebrity child with a famous father. I just don&rsquo;t get into other people&rsquo;s business because of my father&rsquo;s situation, you see.</p></blockquote><p>After the trial, Bonds&rsquo; legal team asked the judge to overturn the verdict, saying it was unsupported by the evidence. Bonds lawyer Dennis Riordan also argued that it was unfair for Bonds to stand convicted of obstruction when the jury didn&rsquo;t find he had lied under oath. Bonds&rsquo; response to the question was literally true, he also said.</p><p>But the government said the jury was within its rights in returning the verdict. Prosecutor Merry Chan said there was nothing innocent about Bonds&#39; answer. It was &ldquo;rambling, corruptly intended to evade, mislead and provide false testimony,&rdquo; she told the judge.</p> Public Safety Daily Report Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Sat, 27 Aug 2011 03:51:56 +0000 Lance Williams 12326 at http://californiawatch.org subtle_devices/Flickr Judge to rule on tossing Bonds felony conviction http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/judge-rule-tossing-bonds-felony-conviction-12273 <p><strong><em>UPDATE: This post was updated with coverage of the hearing Thursday</em></strong></p><p>A federal judge said today she would rule in writing on baseball slugger Barry Bonds&rsquo; plea to overturn his felony conviction from a trial on steroid-related perjury charges.</p><p>At a hearing in federal court in San Francisco, Judge Susan Illston listened to arguments from prosecution and defense attorneys on the legality of Bonds&#39; conviction for obstruction of justice, the lone count on which the jury returned a guilty verdict. She gave little indication of what her ruling would be and no timeline.</p><p>Bonds&rsquo; lawyer, Dennis Riordan, urged the judge to toss the verdict, saying evidence was insufficient. But federal prosecutor Merry Chan said the jury had ample cause to convict the former San Francisco Giants star.</p><p>-----------------------</p><p>In April, a jury found Bonds guilty of obstruction for giving a rambling, evasive answer to a question from a federal grand jury in 2003. The panel was investigating elite athletes&rsquo; use of banned drugs obtained from BALCO, the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame.</p><p>On the witness stand, Bonds was asked whether he had ever received injectable drugs from his weight trainer, Greg Anderson, who later confessed to dealing BALCO steroids.</p><p>In a discursive reply, Bonds never addressed the question head on. At one point, he told jurors he had been &ldquo;a celebrity child, not in baseball by my own instincts.&rdquo;</p><p>Riordan, who is Bonds&rsquo; appeals specialist, urged the judge to set the verdict aside. The long-winded answer was literally a true statement, he said, and he argued that at other points in the testimony Bonds had addressed the question by denying Anderson had given him injectable drugs. He asked the judge to declare Bonds innocent &ndash; or at the very least order a new trial.</p><p>But Chan said there was nothing innocent about Bonds&#39; answer .</p><p>It was &ldquo;rambling, corruptly intended to evade, mislead and provide false testimony,&rdquo; she told the judge.</p><p>The judge gave few hints about how she would rule. But at one point, she said she didn&rsquo;t intend to merely consider the single question and answer underlying the conviction.</p><p>In an interchange with Riordan, she said she would &ldquo;look at the totality of the evidence &hellip; in order to determine whether this statement could properly have amounted to an obstruction of justice.&rdquo;</p><p>One juror refused to vote to convict the former San Francisco Giants star of lying about using banned drugs, jurors said in post-trial interviews. As the jury described it, the verdict was a compromise.</p><p>But the holdout agreed to join the other 11 panelists in finding baseball&#39;s home run king guilty of obstruction.</p><p>And so the jury returned its muddled verdict: The members deadlocked on three charges that Bonds had lied under oath to a federal grand jury about his use of steroids. But they convicted Bonds of obstruction, saying he deliberately misled the grand jury.</p><p>It would be a surprise if the judge set aside the verdict, said Golden Gate University law professor Peter Keane, who has followed issues in the case.</p><p>&ldquo;She would likely leave that to the appellate courts,&rdquo; he said about the points the defense has raised.</p><p>In 2003, Bonds testified before the U.S. grand jury that was investigating the BALCO sports steroids scandal. He repeatedly denied knowingly using banned drugs. At one point in the session, a prosecutor asked him if his trainer&nbsp;had ever given him any substance that &rdquo;required a syringe to inject yourself with.&rdquo;</p><p>Bonds replied:</p><blockquote><p>I&rsquo;ve only had one doctor touch me. And that&rsquo;s my only personal doctor. Greg, like I said, we don&rsquo;t get into each other&#39;s personal lives. We&rsquo;re friends, but I don&rsquo;t &ndash; we don&rsquo;t sit around and talk baseball, because he knows I don&rsquo;t want &ndash; don&rsquo;t come to my house talking baseball.</p><p>If you want to come to my house and talk about fishing, some other stuff, we&rsquo;ll be good friends, you come around talking about baseball, you go on. I don&rsquo;t talk about his business. You know what I mean? &hellip;</p><p>That&rsquo;s what keeps our friendship. You know, I am sorry, but that &ndash; you know, that &ndash; I was a celebrity child, not just in baseball by my own instincts. I became a celebrity child with a famous father. I just don&rsquo;t get into other people&rsquo;s business because of my father&rsquo;s situation, you see.</p></blockquote><p>That answer was obstruction of justice, the jury ruled &ndash; a deliberate attempt to interfere with the grand jury&rsquo;s probe.</p><p>Bonds still has not been sentenced. Under federal guidelines, he could be sentenced to prison, but experts believe he faces only a sentence of house arrest.</p> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 25 Aug 2011 23:55:36 +0000 Lance Williams 12273 at http://californiawatch.org magerleagues/Flickr Bonds prosecutors get more time to decide on new trial http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-prosecutors-get-more-time-decide-new-trial-11061 <p>A federal judge rejected a demand by Barry Bonds&rsquo; attorneys today to force prosecutors to reveal whether they intend to retry the home run king for perjury.</p><p>Bonds was found guilty in April on one count of obstruction of justice for testimony he gave to a grand jury investigating a steroids ring in 2003. The jury deadlocked on three perjury counts, and U.S. District Judge Susan Illston declared a mistrial on those.</p><p>Initially, prosecutors had planned to announce by today whether they would retry Bonds for allegedly lying to the grand jury about knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs. But in recent court filings, they argued they deserved more time because after the trial, defense attorneys filed a motion to toss the obstruction conviction and have a new trial.</p><p>At this morning&rsquo;s hearing, Illston agreed with prosecutors that the issue needed to be resolved before they made a decision on retrying the other counts.</p><p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think it&#39;s sensible to set a retrial on the mistried counts until we know whether there&rsquo;s going to be a need for a trial on the convicted count,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Illston appeared frustrated with defense attorney Allen Ruby when he inquired about the government&rsquo;s plan on the mistried counts.</p><p>&ldquo;You can ask them directly anytime you like Mr. Ruby,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It seems to me manifestly unlikely that a decision like that is going to be made until a decision on the motion (to acquit) is made. Don&#39;t you think that&#39;s right?&rdquo;</p><p>Bonds watched the exchange calmly from his seat next to his attorneys.</p><p>Defense attorneys have argued that the obstruction conviction, in which jurors found Bonds intentionally evaded a question about whether his trainer ever injected him, should be thrown out.</p><p>Instead of directly responding to the question, Bonds gave a rambling answer about how he had been a &ldquo;celebrity child.&rdquo;</p><p>Defense attorneys argued that Bonds answered the question directly in other parts of his testimony and that the statement was truthful.</p><p>&ldquo;Unauthorized rambling is not a federal crime,&rdquo; the attorneys wrote in the filing.</p><p>The government will file a brief on the acquittal issue by July 27, and attorneys will appear in court for oral arguments on Aug. 26. After that, prosecutors will decide whether to retry the perjury counts.</p><p><strong><em>Correction: </em></strong><em>An earlier version of this post gave an incorrect date for the deadline by which prosecutors must file a brief on the acquittal issue. The correct date is July 27. </em></p> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 23 Jun 2011 17:41:26 +0000 Stephanie Rice 11061 at http://californiawatch.org U.S. government 'Bonds should not have used asteroids' and other misconceptions http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-should-not-have-used-asteroids-and-other-misconceptions-9896 <p>He hadn&rsquo;t played a ball game in three years. Nine years had elapsed since a federal drug raid first linked his name to steroids.</p><p>Nevertheless, until the moment when the jury brought back its muddled verdict (guilty of obstruction, deadlock on perjury), the trial of Barry Bonds provoked intense interest and excited debate among sports fans.</p><p>Did baseball&rsquo;s home run champion know he was taking BALCO&rsquo;s banned drugs? Was the former Giants slugger guilty of lying under oath about it? Was the government wrong to target him?</p><p>But all too often, the passionate arguments about the Bonds trial were based on a misunderstanding of basic facts. And so, at times, the debate was slightly out of kilter &ndash; like the quote in our headline. (It&rsquo;s an El Cerrito Little Leaguer&rsquo;s pronouncement about the whole sorry mess, relayed by his coach a few years back.)</p><p>Here, from online comments, are some misconceptions about Bonds, BALCO and the trial, along with the actual facts:</p><p><strong>Bonds should have just taken the 5th at the Congressional hearing. Pretty dumb. ... </strong><strong>If he&#39;d kept quiet during the original government interview, he wouldn&#39;t be here now.</strong></p><p><strong>Why did the FEDS grant immunity to all the baseball players that testified except for BONDS on the BALCO case? </strong></p><p>Other baseball players &ndash; but not Bonds &ndash; testified at Congressional hearings regarding steroids in sports. Bonds&rsquo; alleged perjury was in testimony before the federal grand jury that investigated the BALCO steroids scandal in 2003.</p><p>More than 30 elite athletes were called to testify about BALCO. All, including Bonds, were given immunity from prosecution. As a result, they couldn&rsquo;t cite their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination to avoid testifying.</p><p><strong>The only thing I care about in this case is that prosecutors are wasting our taxpayer money to score political points for their own elections...</strong></p><p><strong>I believe the FBI should face multiple counts of obstruction of justice.</strong></p><p>The Bonds prosecutors work for the U.S. attorney general, who is appointed by the president, not elected.</p><p>The BALCO steroids probe started under John Ashcroft, who was appointed attorney general by President George W.&nbsp;Bush, a Republican. At the time of Bonds&rsquo; trial, the prosecutors&rsquo; new boss was Eric Holder, who was appointed by President Barack Obama, a Democrat.</p><p>The lead federal agency on BALCO was the IRS; the Food &amp; Drug Administration became involved when IRS agent Jeff Novitzky took a job with the FDA. The FBI played almost no role.</p><p><strong>I absolutely despise (the baseball players who testified in the Bonds trial). It&#39;s one thing to rat on someone plotting terrorism or murder but it&#39;s another to rat out a colleague that was doing what you were doing.</strong></p><p>The baseball players who testified said they got banned drugs from Greg Anderson, who they knew because he was Bonds&rsquo; trainer. But none of them said anything about Bonds using banned drugs.</p><p><strong>If I were Bonds&#39; lawyer I would have asked the personal shopper the following: Are you a qualified chemist to know what was in the injection? If the answer is no, as it has to be, then her testimony goes out the window.</strong></p><p>Bonds faced a perjury charge because he testified that no one but a physician had ever given him an injection of any kind. Personal shopper Kathy Hoskins testified she saw Bonds getting an injection in the abdomen from his trainer. She never claimed to know what it was. The government said it was obviously human growth hormone. The jury deadlocked 11-1 in favor of conviction on this count.</p><p><strong>Why don&#39;t Mark McGwire and Roger (Clemens) have trial dates? Why haven&#39;t they been getting dragged for the last 8 years to court?</strong></p><p>At a Congressional hearing, McGwire, the former Oakland and St. Louis slugger, declined to answer questions about his steroid use, saying, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not here to talk about the past.&rdquo; He might have been cited for contempt, but the lawmakers decided not to pursue it.</p><p>At a different hearing, Clemens, a former Yankees and Red Sox fireballer, testified that he had never used banned drugs, but his former trainer told lawmakers Clemens had used steroids for years. Clemens was indicted for perjury. His trial is scheduled to begin in July in Washington, D.C.</p><p><strong>The jury is not aware of the fact that April 8 is the anniversary of the day Hank Aaron hit (home run number) 715 to break Babe Ruth&#39;s record. So if they find Bonds not guilty on April 8, baseball should just shut up and give Barry Bonds all the respect that comes from being the true record holder.</strong></p><p>Actually, the Bonds verdict came in on April 13 &ndash; the 48<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the first major league hit by Pete Rose, baseball&rsquo;s career hit leader, who&nbsp; was banned and imprisoned for betting on games while manager of the Cincinnati Reds. It was baseball&#39;s biggest scandal, until the Bonds case.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9896&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Tue, 19 Apr 2011 07:05:09 +0000 Lance Williams 9896 at http://californiawatch.org ginosphotos/istockphoto.com After alleged steroid use, Bonds' slugging increased http://californiawatch.org/public-safety/after-alleged-steroid-use-bonds-slugging-increased-9817 <p>Bonds began using steroids after the 1998 season, according to evidence in the BALCO case. Before that, he was a .290 hitter with speed and good power, as a composite view of his first 13 seasons in the major leagues shows.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">After the 1998 season, Bonds&rsquo; batting average increased 9 percent and his home-run power increased by 22 percent, the composite shows.</p><table border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="margin: 1em auto 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-collapse: collapse; width: 606px;"><tbody style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 1px 0px 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-top: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);"><tr style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><td colspan="5" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 128px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">Bonds COMPOSITE seasons</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 23px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">G</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">AB</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">R</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">H</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">2b</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 32px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">3b</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 36px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">Hr</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 39px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">rbi</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">sb</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">cs</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">BB</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 41px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">SO</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-right: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 52px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">Avg.</p></td></tr><tr style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 2px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 1px;">&nbsp;</td><td colspan="4" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 148px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">1986-1998</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">146</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">509</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">105</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">147</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">31</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 32px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">5</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 36px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">32</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 39px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">93</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">34</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">10</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">104</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 41px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">80</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 1px 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-right: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 52px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">0.290</p></td></tr><tr style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 2px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 1px;">&nbsp;</td><td colspan="4" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 148px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">1999-2007</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">121</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">358</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">96</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">113</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">22</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 32px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">2</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 36px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">39</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 39px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">87</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">8</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">1</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">133</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 41px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">54</p></td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 1px 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-right: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 52px;"><p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">0.316</p></td></tr><tr style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><td colspan="3" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 18px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 17px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 93px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 23px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 32px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 36px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 39px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 35px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 43px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 41px;">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 1px 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-right: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); width: 52px;">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr height="0" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 0px 0px 1px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td><td style="margin: 0px; padding: 0.5em; border-width: 1px 1px 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; border-left: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-top: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222); border-right: 1px solid rgb(222, 222, 222);">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">Source:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.baseball-reference.com/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; text-decoration: underline; color: rgb(0, 70, 100);" title="www.baseball-reference.com/">www.baseball-reference.com</a></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9817&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 14 Apr 2011 03:56:06 +0000 Lance Williams 9817 at http://californiawatch.org Bonds was biggest name caught up in BALCO scandal http://californiawatch.org/public-safety/bonds-was-biggest-name-caught-balco-scandal-9813 <p>The biggest target of the BALCO investigation was Barry Bonds, former Giants slugger and baseball&rsquo;s all-time home run leader.</p><p>But from the 2003 federal drug raid on the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame to Bonds&#39; 2011 trial on perjury charges, an unlikely cast of elite athletes, steroid dealers, and other figures were drawn into the case.</p><p>Here, from public records, are profiles:</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">DEALERS:</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><strong>Victor Conte, founder of BALCO</strong></p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">ROLE: Mastermind of the conspiracy to corrupt sports with undetectable steroids, he pleaded guilty to steroid dealing.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">RESULT: Served four months at what he called a &ldquo;Club Fed&rdquo; work camp, then resumed selling nutritional supplements through a new business, SNAC Systems.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">TODAY: In interviews, Conte has implicated many athletes in the use of steroids, but said he never provided banned drugs to Barry Bonds. In February, he told HBO he is training Chicago Cubs outfielder Marlon Byrd but is not giving him drugs.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><strong>Greg Anderson, Bonds&rsquo; weight trainer</strong></p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">ROLE: Anderson pleaded guilty to steroid dealing in the BALCO case, but refused to testify about Bonds.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">RESULT: Anderson served three months in federal prison for his steroids conviction. He spent more than a year for contempt of court after he refused to testify before the grand jury investigating Bonds. Federal agents also investigated his wife and mother-in-law.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">TODAY: Anderson was working as a trainer at a gym in Foster City when the government subpoenaed him to testify at Bonds&rsquo; trial. He again refused to testify, and the judge again jailed him.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">OTHERS: <strong>James Valente, BALCO vice president</strong>, pleaded guilty to steroid dealing and was put on probation. He no longer works with Conte. <strong>Remi Korchemny, elite track coach</strong> and BALCO associate, also received probation after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor drug charge. He was banned from elite sports but, with Conte, trained bantamweight boxer Nonito Donaire, the Las Vegas Review Journal reported.&nbsp;<strong>Patrick Arnold, the chemist</strong> who created the undetectable steroid called &ldquo;the clear,&rdquo; pleaded guilty to steroid dealing and served four months. He owns a nutritional supplements company in Illinois.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">THE ACCUSED:</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><strong>Marion Jones, Olympic champion</strong></p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">ROLE: Winner of five medals at the 2000 Olympics, she pleaded guilty to lying about her use of banned drugs from BALCO and about her role in a New York check forgery ring.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">RESULT: Jones made a tearful public apology, then served six months in federal prison. Olympic officials stripped her of her medals, and she said she was &ldquo;ruined financially.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">TODAY: Paroled, she played pro basketball last year with the Tulsa Shock of the WNBA. In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, she said she never &ldquo;knowingly&rdquo; took banned drugs. Conte, who claims he injected her, called her a liar.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><strong>Trevor Graham, elite track coach</strong></p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">ROLE: The coach of Marion Jones and other stars, he tipped authorities to BALCO by sending them a syringe of &ldquo;the clear.&rdquo; But he was indicted for lying about his own distribution of banned drugs.</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">RESULT: At a San Francisco trial, Olympic gold medalists Antonio Pettigrew, Jerome Young and Dennis Mitchell testified Graham told them to get steroids from his Mexican drug &ldquo;connection.&rdquo;</p><p style="margin: 1em 0px 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; outline-width: 0px; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">TODAY: The jury foreman accused the government of targeting Graham because of a &ldquo;lust for blood,&rdquo; but he was convicted of a felony and served one year of house arrest in North Carolina. He was banned from Olympic sports. The Olympians who testified were stripped of their medals, and Pettigrew committed suicide.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9813&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 14 Apr 2011 03:54:06 +0000 Lance Williams 9813 at http://californiawatch.org Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice, jury deadlocked on perjury counts http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-guilty-obstruction-justice-jury-deadlocked-perjury-counts-9792 <p>Barry Bonds, the former Giants slugger and baseball&rsquo;s home run champion, was found guilty of obstruction of justice Wednesday for giving evasive answers to a federal grand jury that was questioning&nbsp;him about his use of performance-enhancing drugs.</p><p>The jury deadlocked on three perjury charges, and Judge Susan Illston declared a mistrial on those counts.</p><p>A jury of eight women and four men returned the verdict after a three-week trial in federal court in San Francisco. They began deliberating on Friday.</p><p>Judge Illston set a May 20 hearing, in part to determine whether the government wants a retrial on the perjury counts. Bonds&rsquo; lawyer, Allen Ruby, said the defense will ask the judge to throw out the verdict, saying a conviction for obstruction was inconsistent with the jury&#39;s deadlock on the perjury count.</p><p>The lone conviction came on a count charging Bonds with intentionally giving evasive, false or misleading testimony. In answer to a question about whether his trainer gave him injectable drugs, Bonds gave a rambling answer, saying he was a &ldquo;celebrity child, not just in baseball by my own instincts.&rdquo; The answer was obstruction of justice, the jury ruled &ndash; a deliberate attempt to interfere with the grand jury&rsquo;s probe.</p><p>Bonds showed no reaction to the verdict. He left court without saying anything.</p><p>No sentencing date was set, and Bonds is free in the meantime. Bonds could face about two years in prison under federal guidelines, although some legal experts say he will likely only face house arrest.</p><p>U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag said the trial was about truth and justice.</p><p>&quot;In the United States, taking an oath and promising to testify truthfully is a serious matter,&quot; she said in a statement. &quot;We cannot ignore those who choose instead to obstruct justice.&quot;</p><p>Outside court, jurors said they unanimously believed Bonds had been deliberately evasive in response to questions about whether he had ever been injected with banned drugs.</p><p>They deadlocked 11-1 in favor of convicting Bonds on one perjury charge. That was based on Bonds&#39; claims that he had never received an injection from anyone other than his physician. Bonds&#39; former assistant had testified she saw Bonds getting a shot in the abdomen from his trainer, Greg Anderson.</p><p>But jurors said they deadlocked in favor of acquittal on two other charges based on Bonds&#39; denials that he had knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone. The government&nbsp; failed to prove that Bonds knew Anderson was providing him with banned drugs, jurors said.</p><p>The charges stemmed from Bonds&rsquo; Dec. 4, 2003 testimony before the grand jury that investigated steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame.&nbsp;</p><p>Bonds claimed&nbsp;Anderson, who pleaded guilty to steroid dealing in the BALCO case, had supplied him only with flax seed oil and arthritis cream &ndash; not the BALCO designer steroids &ldquo;the clear&rdquo; and &ldquo;the cream.&rdquo;</p><p>Bonds was indicted in 2007, two months after he set baseball&rsquo;s career home run mark at age 43. He pleaded not guilty, saying he would fight for vindication. He hasn&rsquo;t played baseball since the charges were filed.</p><p>In the trial, prosecutors called more than two dozen witnesses to prove their claim that Bonds was a &ldquo;secret&rdquo; steroid user who simply couldn&rsquo;t bear to confess his use of multiple banned drugs.</p><p>In his final argument, prosecutor Jeff Nedrow cataloged the government&rsquo;s evidence of Bonds&rsquo; drug use. A retest of a urine sample Bonds gave to baseball&rsquo;s steroid control program in 2003 showed the slugger was using &ldquo;the clear&rdquo; and other drugs. On a secret recording made in the Giants&rsquo; clubhouse, Anderson described the banned drugs he said he was giving Bonds. Kathy Hoskins, Bonds&#39; former personal shopper, <span _fck_bookmark="1" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span>said she saw Anderson inject Bonds in 2002 with what prosecutors said was human growth hormone.</p><p>Two other former confidants &ndash; Steve Hoskins, Kathy Hoskins&#39; brother and Bonds&rsquo; longtime business manager, and Kimberly Bell, Bonds&#39; girlfriend for nine years &ndash; said Bonds told them about his steroid use. Former Giants trainer Stan Conte said Bonds told him in 2003 that he was aware Anderson was selling steroids. Former Oakland A&rsquo;s and New York Yankees star Jason Giambi and three former baseball players testified that Anderson had sold them banned drugs, including &ldquo;the cream&rdquo; and &ldquo;the clear.&rdquo;</p><p>Bonds himself didn&rsquo;t testify and the defense didn&rsquo;t call any other witnesses. But his legal team, led by San Jose attorney Ruby, put on a determined defense, repeatedly persuading the judge to pare back the evidence prosecutors could use in the trial. And they aggressively cross-examined the government&rsquo;s witnesses, claiming the Giants star was being framed.</p><p>Defense lawyer Cristina Arguedas kept Bell on the witness stand for more than four hours. She portrayed Bell as a jilted lover who tried to profit from her broken relationship with Bonds by posing nude for Playboy and pitching a tell-all book about him. Bell insisted that in 1999, Bonds confessed to her that he was using steroids, blaming the injectable drug Winstrol for a career-threatening elbow injury.</p><p>Ruby cross-examined Steve Hoskins for nearly as long. He accused the business manager of selling fake Bonds memorabilia and keeping the money, and charged that Hoskins trumped up the steroid allegations to deflect an FBI probe of the alleged fraud. But Hoskins said the allegations were bogus, and he insisted that he had tried for years to persuade Bonds, his best friend, to stop using banned drugs.</p><p>The defense made little headway in cross-examining Kathy Hoskins about an incident in Bonds&#39; bedroom in 2002: She said she saw Anderson inject Bonds in the abdomen&nbsp;with what prosecutors said was human growth hormone. Bonds then told her the shot was &ldquo;undetectable,&rdquo; a &ldquo;little something-something&rdquo; for an upcoming Giants road trip.</p><p>Anderson refused to testify against Bonds, and spent the trial in federal prison for contempt of court &ndash; the fourth time he had been imprisoned in connection with BALCO. In a key ruling, the judge decreed that without the trainer&rsquo;s testimony, the government could not use what it characterized as significant additional evidence of Bonds&rsquo; drug use, including doping calendars and private steroid screens that showed he was using banned drugs for several years.</p><p>Jurors said they disregarded much of the government&#39;s evidence, saying they were bothered by contradictions in the accounts of Bell and Steve Hoskins. One juror also distrusted Kathy Hoskins&#39; testimony, they said.</p><p>&quot;It took work to get to that obstruction conviction,&quot; said a juror who identified himself by his first name, Steve. &quot;There was one juror who could have gone no on all counts. It was real work.&quot;</p><p>The trial itself was as much about how Bonds will be regarded in baseball history as it concerned basic questions of crime and punishment.</p><p>Depending on how heavily precedent weighs in this case, experts say it is not certain that he will serve any prison time at all. In 2008, juries convicted both an Olympic track coach and an elite bicycle racer of lying about steroids, and Judge Illston sentenced them to house arrest.</p><p>The guilty verdict damages Bonds&rsquo; place in baseball history and his chances of being elected to baseball&rsquo;s Hall of Fame. One of the greatest hitters of all time, Bonds holds baseball&rsquo;s single season and career records for home runs, and he won the Most Valuable Player award an unprecedented seven times. But the cloud of a felony conviction might deny him election to the hall, experts said.</p><p>Some compared his case to that of Pete Rose, holder of the lifetime record for most hits, who was implicated in betting on baseball while manager of the Cincinnati Reds. He was banned from baseball and imprisoned for tax evasion. He has never been named to the Hall of Fame.</p><p>The verdict brings down the curtain on BALCO, a wide-ranging federal investigation into performance-enhancing drugs and elite sports. The probe began in 2002. Federal agents received tips that Anderson and Victor Conte, founder of BALCO, were dealing steroids.</p><p>It became public the following year, when armed IRS agents raided BALCO and Anderson&rsquo;s Burlingame condominium. They seized what the government called a &ldquo;mountain of evidence&rdquo; of a conspiracy to corrupt elite sports by distributing designer steroids that were undetectable in state-of-the-art drug tests.</p><p>In the years that followed, six steroid dealers and four sports figures &ndash; Olympic superstar Marion Jones among them &ndash; were convicted of BALCO-related crimes. The case led Congress to convene televised hearings on steroids in baseball and toughen anti-steroid laws. Major League Baseball also hired former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell to investigate the sport&rsquo;s so-called &ldquo;steroid era;&rdquo; his report named 86 big leaguers as users of banned drugs.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9792&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Wed, 13 Apr 2011 21:57:33 +0000 Lance Williams 9792 at http://californiawatch.org U.S. District Court Bonds jury heads into 4th day of deliberations http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-jury-heads-4th-day-deliberations-9793 <p>The jury in the Barry Bonds perjury trial deliberated for a third day today without reaching a verdict.</p><p>The panel of eight women and four men made no requests of Judge Susan Illston, who presided over the trial in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. The jury began work shortly after 8:30 a.m., took a lunch break and worked until about 3:15 p.m.</p><p>Bonds, the former Giants star and baseball&rsquo;s home run champion, is charged with perjury and obstruction of justice. He is accused of lying under oath to the grand jury that investigated steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame. He said he had never knowingly used banned drugs.</p><p>He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.</p><p>The jury got the case on Friday. Since then, the panel has come back into court to listen to a tape of Bonds&rsquo; trainer discussing the banned drugs he said he was supplying Bonds, and a read-back of testimony by Bonds&rsquo; former personal shopper, who said she saw the trainer give Bonds an injection.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9793&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Tue, 12 Apr 2011 23:29:46 +0000 Lance Williams 9793 at http://californiawatch.org magerleagues/Flickr Bonds jury gets read-back of testimony, deliberations continue http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-jury-gets-read-back-testimony-deliberations-continue-9778 <p>The jury in the Barry Bonds perjury trial heard a reading of key testimony Monday, then deliberated for the rest of the day without announcing a verdict.</p><p>After getting the case on Friday, the eight women and four men on the panel had told Judge Susan Illston they wanted to listen again to<strong> </strong>the testimony of Kathy Hoskins, who said she saw Greg Anderson injecting Bonds in the abdomen. The court reporter read it to them this morning.</p><p>Hoskins, who was Bonds&rsquo; personal assistant, testified in the trial that the incident occurred in the bedroom of Bonds&rsquo; Hillsborough home in 2002, while<strong> </strong>she was packing Bonds&rsquo; clothes for a Giants road trip. The government said the injection was obviously human growth hormone.</p><p>On cross-examination, defense lawyer Cristina Arguedas suggested that Kathy Hoskins fabricated her account to benefit her brother, Steve Hoskins, Bonds&rsquo; former business manager, who also testified for the government.</p><p>Jurors listened attentively to the reading, which lasted a little more than an hour. Several took&nbsp;notes. The jury worked the rest of the day, then went home. Deliberations were to resume tomorrow.</p><p>Bonds is charged with perjury and obstruction of justice. He is accused of lying under oath to the grand jury that investigated steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame. He said he had never knowingly used banned drugs.</p><p>He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9778&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Tue, 12 Apr 2011 00:35:10 +0000 Lance Williams 9778 at http://californiawatch.org subtle_devices/Flickr Experts: Bonds' perjury trial 'too close to call' http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/experts-bonds-perjury-trial-too-close-call-9732 <p>For Barry Bonds&rsquo; jury, it can&rsquo;t be an easy call.</p><p>They&rsquo;ve been asked to sort out a fiercely contested legal fight in which the evidence &ndash; depending on how it&rsquo;s viewed &ndash; could support either an outright exoneration or a cascade of guilty verdicts.</p><p>If the jury is offended by the idea of federal law enforcement policing the use of performance-enhancing drugs in elite sports, the trial could end in acquittal.</p><p>But if the jury starts to dig into the evidence &ndash; especially the testimony of a personal shopper who says she saw Bonds being injected by his trainer &ndash; baseball&rsquo;s home run champion could wind up being convicted of a felony.</p><p>Those are some of the views expressed in a California Watch survey of legal experts who are tracking Bonds&rsquo; trial on perjury charges in federal court in San Francisco.</p><p>&ldquo;This case is ending as it began,&rdquo; said San Francisco lawyer William Keane, who represented Olympic track coach Trevor Graham in a case that parallels that of Bonds.</p><p>It&rsquo;s &ldquo;too close to call, with the jury having its work cut out for it,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>The former Giants slugger is accused of lying under oath and obstructing justice in connection with his testimony before the federal grand jury that probed the BALCO steroids scandal in 2003. Bonds said he had never knowingly used banned drugs, and denied that he had been provided with designer steroids from the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative in Burlingame.</p><p>His trainer, Greg Anderson, gave him only flaxseed oil and arthritis balm, he said. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.</p><p>Bonds didn&rsquo;t testify in the trial, and his lawyers didn&rsquo;t call any witnesses.</p><p>On Friday, after three weeks of testimony and argument, the jury of eight women and four men began deliberating.</p><p>Keane, a former prosecutor turned defense specialist, said he thought the biggest challenge for Bonds&rsquo; legal team was the so-called &ldquo;injection count&rdquo; &ndash; a charge that accuses Bonds of lying when he said he had never received an injection from anybody but a doctor.</p><p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s direct evidence by a witness, Kathy Hoskins, who has relatively little baggage,&rdquo; Keane said, referring to the former personal shopper. She told the jury that in 2002, while packing Bonds for a road trip, Anderson entered Bonds&#39; bedroom and gave the slugger an injection in the abdomen. Late Friday, the panel said they wanted to listen to a read-back of her testimony, indicating some jurors were interested in it.</p><p>Unlike Hoskins, the other Bonds confidants who testified for the government carried &ldquo;Hall of Fame baggage,&rdquo; the lawyer said.</p><p>Hoskins&rsquo; brother, Steve Hoskins, who was Bonds&rsquo; business manager until a bitter falling out, said the slugger confessed he was using banned drugs. But in Keane&rsquo;s view, defense lawyer Allen Ruby scored points on cross-examination. Ruby suggested Hoskins concocted his story to deflect an FBI investigation after Bonds accused Hoskins of memorabilia fraud.</p><p>Likewise, Keane said defense lawyer Cristina Arguedas probably raised doubts about the credibility of former Bonds girlfriend Kim Bell, who said that in 1999 the slugger told her he was using steroids.&nbsp;During grueling questioning, Arguedas portrayed Bell as a jilted ex-lover trying to profit off her association with the slugger by posing nude for Playboy magazine.</p><p>As a result, Bonds stands a better chance of acquittal on counts that accuse him of lying when he said he never obtained steroids or human growth hormone from Anderson.</p><p>Professor Robert Talbot, a law professor at the University of San Francisco, said he believes the verdicts in the Bonds case would unfold depending on how the jury answers a threshold question &ndash; are an athlete&rsquo;s lies about steroids even important?</p><p>&ldquo;The jury verdict might depend on how seriously they take this whole matter,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Around the city, one often hears the view that prosecuting Bonds is a waste of government time and money, Talbot noted. Unless prosecutors succeeded in convincing the jury that perjury is a serious crime and steroids are a real problem, the panel might not engage on the government evidence, he said. In that event, a favorable verdict for the former Giants slugger is likely, he said.</p><p>Talbot also said the defense had been effective in its cross-examination of Bonds&rsquo; orthopedist, Dr. Arthur Ting. A government witness, Ting was called to buttress the testimony of Hoskins, the former business manager, who said he had tried for years to get Bonds off steroids.</p><p>But under questioning by Arguedas, Ting denied that he had ever even discussed Bonds and steroids with Hoskins, as Hoskins had testified.</p><p>&ldquo;If the jury was looking for a reason to find him not guilty, there it was,&rdquo; Talbot said of Bonds. He agreed that the testimony of Hoskins&rsquo; sister about the injection posed the biggest problem for the defense.</p><p>So did Stephen Moskowitz, a San Francisco tax lawyer and legal commentator who has been following the trial.</p><p>&ldquo;If I was Barry, that&rsquo;s the number one thing I would be worrying about,&rdquo; he said of the&nbsp; injection count. The other charges are &ldquo;weak, and could easily fall,&rdquo; Moskowitz said, because the defense succeeded in raising doubts about the credibility of the Bonds confidants.</p><p>&ldquo;I know nobody believes Barry, but we should consider, just consider, that he is telling the truth,&rdquo; he also said.</p><p>Robert Musante, a former prosecutor who teaches cross-examination techniques to civil lawyers, said the government would have had a far stronger case if Bonds had been subjected to tough questioning at the grand jury.</p><p>Musante, of Walnut Creek, called the 2003 session &ldquo;one woefully lame deposition,&rdquo; saying prosecutors missed a golden chance to get at the truth about Bonds and steroids. Their biggest failure, in his view: They didn&#39;t challenge Bonds when he made the &quot;absurd&quot; claim that he routinely ingested substances provided by his trainer without ever finding out what they were.</p><p>The prosecutors &ldquo;accepted nonsense answers and went on to another subject&rdquo; rather than asking pointed follow-ups, said Musante. If they had zeroed in, they might have learned what was actually going on &ndash; thus making the ensuing investigation, indictment and trial unnecessary. Musante said he uses the Bonds grand jury transcript in classes, as an example of how not to question a witness.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9732&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Sun, 10 Apr 2011 01:08:52 +0000 Lance Williams 9732 at http://californiawatch.org Bonds jury listens again to secret clubhouse recording http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/bonds-jury-listens-again-secret-clubhouse-recording-9730 <p>Barry Bonds&rsquo; jury listened intently to a recording of trainer Greg Anderson describing the banned drugs he said he was providing to the former Giants star in 2003.</p><p>After that, the panel asked federal Judge Susan Illston for a reading of the testimony of former personal shopper Kathy Hoskins, who said she saw Anderson inject Bonds in the abdomen in 2002.</p><p>The jury of eight women and four men finished their full first day of deliberations Friday in Bonds&rsquo; trial on perjury charges without reaching a verdict. They said they would return Monday.</p><p>Also Friday, Bonds&rsquo; trainer was freed from the federal prison where he was held since the trial began. Anderson refused to testify for prosecutors, who said they wanted to ask him about the banned drugs they say he was providing to Bonds.</p><p>Judge Illston imprisoned him for contempt of court &ndash; the third time that has occurred since the federal probe of Bonds began. After the jury began deliberating, the judge ordered the trainer freed because it was no longer possible for him to testify even if he changed his mind.</p><p>Bonds is charged with four felonies. He is accused of lying under oath to the federal grand jury that investigated steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative in Burlingame in 2003. He testified that he had never knowingly used banned drugs, and pleaded not guilty to the charges.</p><p>Early Friday, the jury asked the judge if they could listen to the Anderson recording, which was first played for them during testimony. It was made in the Giants&rsquo; clubhouse early in the 2003 season by Steve Hoskins, Bonds&rsquo; former business manager. On the recording, Anderson, who is unaware he is being recorded, seemingly acknowledges giving Bonds steroid injections. At another point, he describes undetectable drugs that he says he is providing the Giants star.</p><p>Bonds&rsquo; lawyers urged the jury to ignore the recording, arguing that it was unreliable evidence because it was made by Hoskins. The defense claimed the business manager made the recording so he could extort money from Bonds. Hoskins testified he made it as part of an effort to get Bonds off drugs.</p><p>Late in the day the jury asked for the read-back of the testimony of Hoskins&rsquo; sister, Kathy Hoskins. She said that while packing Bonds&rsquo; clothes before a Giants road trip in 2002, Anderson came into Bonds&rsquo; bedroom and gave the slugger an injection. Bonds described the injection as &ldquo;a little something, something for the road,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>The defense has urged the jury not to credit the testimony, suggesting Kathy Hoskins had been influenced to lie by her brother. The judge said the reading would be done Monday.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9730&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Fri, 08 Apr 2011 23:37:48 +0000 Lance Williams 9730 at http://californiawatch.org ginosphotos/istockphoto.com Barry Bonds perjury case goes to jury http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/barry-bonds-perjury-case-goes-jury-9698 <p>Barry Bonds was a &ldquo;secret&rdquo; steroid user, and the secret of his drug use &ldquo;was so powerful&rdquo; that it impelled the former Giants star to lie under oath about it, a federal prosecutor charged.</p><p>But Bonds&rsquo; defense lawyer countered that the government had brought the jury &ldquo;zero evidence&rdquo; that anything Bonds told a grand jury in 2003 actually disrupted the federal investigation into the BALCO steroid scandal.</p><p>He called the federal investigation of baseball&rsquo;s home run champion &ldquo;very wrong&rdquo; and &ldquo;an effort to demonize Barry Bonds.&rdquo;</p><p>Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeff Nedrow and lead defense lawyer Allen Ruby gave sharply contrasting views Thursday of the evidence in Bonds&rsquo; perjury trial.</p><p>After a day of closing arguments, federal Judge Susan Illston turned the case over to the jury of eight women and four men, instructing them to elect a foreperson. Deliberations were to begin Friday.</p><p>Bonds is accused of lying under oath and obstruction of justice, all for his testimony before the grand jury that was investigating suspected steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative in Burlingame.</p><p>In the fall of 2003, more than 30 elite athletes who had been BALCO customers &ndash;stars of NFL football and Olympic track and field as well as baseball &ndash; were summoned to testify in the secret proceeding.</p><p>Almost all admitted that they had used the BALCO designer steroids called &ldquo;the cream&rdquo; and &ldquo;the clear.&rdquo;</p><p>But Bonds insisted that he had never knowingly used banned drugs, saying his trainer, Greg Anderson, had supplied him only with substances he thought were flax seed oil and arthritis balm. The slugger was indicted four years after the testimony, and shortly after he set baseball&rsquo;s all-time home run record. He has pleaded not guilty to four felony charges.</p><p>Prosecutor Nedrow emphasized that Bonds had been given immunity from prosecution on drug charges before he testified before the grand jury.</p><p>&ldquo;All he had to do was tell the truth,&rdquo; the prosecutor said. But he said Bonds lied anyway hoping to protect his secret use of &ldquo;anabolic steroids and Human Growth Hormone as part of his training regimen.&rdquo;</p><p>The prosecutor continued: &ldquo;The secret was important enough that he didn&rsquo;t want his father to hear about it, he didn&rsquo;t want his employer, the Giants, to find out about it&hellip;The secret led him to false testimony that is implausible on its face.&rdquo;</p><p>Nedrow said the government had presented ample evidence of Bonds&rsquo; drug use. A re-test of a 2003 urine sample submitted by Bonds to Major League Baseball showed the slugger was using &ldquo;the clear,&rdquo; the prosecutor said. A 2003 recording secretly made in the Giants&rsquo; clubhouse captured trainer Greg Anderson&rsquo;s voice as he described the banned drugs he said he was giving to Bonds, and a former personal shopper said she saw Anderson inject Bonds in the stomach in 2002.</p><p>But defense lawyer Allen Ruby countered that prosecutors had done such a poor job they hadn&rsquo;t even established that the evidence the grand jury sought from Bonds was &ldquo;material,&rdquo; or relevant, to the federal probe of BALCO.&nbsp;That&rsquo;s important, Ruby said, because to find Bonds guilty, the jury must conclude that he knowingly lied in ways that could have interfered with the investigation.</p><p>After Ruby, cross-examination specialist Cristina Arguedas took over for the defense, telling the jury that virtually all of the government&rsquo;s case was &ldquo;unworthy of belief.&rdquo;</p><p>She contended that the government had a &ldquo;conflict of interest&rdquo; in its relationship to key prosecution witness Steve Hoskins, Bonds&rsquo; former business manager. In 2003, Bonds had complained to the FBI that Hoskins was stealing sports memorabilia and selling it. She claimed that when the BALCO scandal broke, prosecutors dumped the memorabilia case so they could use Hoskins against Bonds.</p><p>&ldquo;Are they going to treat Barry Bonds as a victim of theft and fraud from Stevie Hoskins, or are they going to treat Stevie Hoskins as a witness when they go after the very high-profile Barry Bonds?&rdquo; Arguedas asked. Hoskins would say anything to get back at Bonds, the lawyer claimed, and so his testimony should be disregarded.</p><p>She also urged the jury to ignore the recording of Anderson. She said it was unreliable because Hoskins made the secret tape, and because the government didn&rsquo;t write proper reports about how they obtained it. Likewise, the lawyer said the testimony about Bonds&rsquo; injection was suspect because it came from Hoskins&rsquo; sister, Kathy Hoskins.</p><p>At the end of the day prosecution team leader Matthew Parrella gave a brief rebuttal. He said his witnesses were truthful, and he accused the defense lawyers of ducking the real issue in the case.</p><p>&ldquo;They never argued that Barry Bonds never took steroids,&rdquo; Parrella said. &ldquo;They&nbsp;never said, &lsquo;My client is not a steroid user, he didn&rsquo;t use anabolic steroids.&rsquo; Do you think they forgot?&nbsp;I don&rsquo;t think so.&rdquo;</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9698&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Fri, 08 Apr 2011 01:37:31 +0000 Lance Williams 9698 at http://californiawatch.org U.S. District Court Lawyers spar in closing arguments in Barry Bonds perjury trial http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/lawyers-spar-closing-arguments-barry-bonds-perjury-trial-9682 <p>Barry Bonds was a &ldquo;secret&rdquo; steroid user, and the secret of his drug use &ldquo;was so powerful&rdquo; that it impelled the former Giants star to lie under oath, a federal prosecutor charged&nbsp;Thursday.</p><p>But Bonds&rsquo; defense lawyer countered that the government had brought the jury &ldquo;no &ndash; zero &ndash; evidence&rdquo; that anything Bonds told a grand jury in 2003 actually disrupted the federal investigation into the BALCO steroid scandal.</p><p>Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeff Nedrow and lead defense lawyer Allen Ruby gave competing closing arguments in Bonds&rsquo; perjury trial in federal court in San Francisco.</p><p>Nedrow told the jury that when baseball&rsquo;s home run champion was summoned before a federal grand jury in 2003 he was desperate to conceal his use of banned drugs.</p><p>The panel wanted to quiz Bonds about suspected steroid dealing at the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative in Burlingame, and&nbsp;&ldquo;all he had to do was tell the truth&rdquo; to the panel, the prosecutor said. That was because&nbsp;Bonds had been granted immunity from prosecution for anything except lying under oath.</p><p>&ldquo;Why would the defendant testify falsely after receiving immunity?&rdquo; Nedrow asked the jury of eight women and four men in U.S. District Court.&nbsp;&ldquo;The reason is he had a secret and it was a powerful secret. ... He had been using anabolic steroids and human growth hormone as part of his training regimen.&rdquo;</p><p>The prosecutor continued: &ldquo;The secret was important enough that he didn&rsquo;t want his father to hear about it, he didn&rsquo;t want his employer, the Giants, to find out about it. ... The secret led him to false testimony that is implausible on its face.&rdquo;</p><p>In an hour-long statement, the prosecutor&nbsp;said the government had presented ample evidence of Bonds&#39; drug use. A retest of a 2003 urine sample submitted by Bonds to Major League Baseball showed the slugger was using the BALCO steroid &ldquo;the clear,&rdquo; the prosecutor said. He said a 2003 recording secretly made in the Giants&rsquo; clubhouse captured trainer Greg Anderson&rsquo;s voice as he described the banned drugs he said he was giving to Bonds; and his former personal shopper said she saw Anderson give Bonds an injection in 2002, he said.</p><p>But at the start of his summation, defense lawyer Ruby&nbsp;charged that the government failed even to have a witness describe the workings of the grand jury, he contended. That was important, Ruby said, because to find Bonds guilty, the jury must conclude that he knowingly made false statements that were &ldquo;material&rdquo; to the grand jury&rsquo;s work &ndash; that is, that they were relevant to the investigation. There was&nbsp;&ldquo;a complete failure of proof&rdquo; on the point, Ruby said early in his remarks.</p><p>In his testimony at the grand jury, Bonds said&nbsp;he had never knowingly used banned drugs, saying he had only obtained flaxseed oil and arthritis balm from Anderson. Bonds has pleaded not guilty to three charges of perjury and one charge of obstruction of justice.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9682&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 07 Apr 2011 19:46:03 +0000 Lance Williams 9682 at http://californiawatch.org kevinrushforth/Flickr Closing arguments next in Bonds perjury trial http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/closing-arguments-next-bonds-perjury-trial-9662 <p>The prosecutors who have portrayed Barry Bonds as a steroid cheat and the defense lawyers who contend he is being framed are set to square off tomorrow in San Francisco federal court.</p><p>Testimony in the perjury trial of baseball&rsquo;s home run champion came to an abrupt end today when defense lawyers said they would not call the former Giants star &ndash; or anyone else &ndash; to the witness stand.</p><p>&ldquo;The defense rests,&rdquo; lead defense lawyer Allen Ruby told Judge Susan Illston.</p><p>The defense team had said it might call half a dozen witnesses, including two of Bonds&rsquo; former lawyers, Michael Rains and Laura Enos, and his former stretching trainer, Harvey Shields. On Tuesday, Ruby had suggested that Bonds himself might take the stand.</p><p>At an afternoon hearing the judge directly addressed Bonds, reminding him that he had a constitutional right to testify and asking him if he wanted to.</p><p>&ldquo;No,&rdquo; Bonds replied.</p><p>The defense move set the stage for final arguments Thursday.</p><p>Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeff Nedrow will go first, the government said. Then the defense will speak &ndash; both Ruby and cross-examination specialist Cristina Arguedas. The government&rsquo;s closing is up to Matthew Parrella, the prosecution team leader.</p><p>Soon after that, the case will go to the jury of eight women and four men.</p><p>Also Wednesday, after prodding from the judge, the government dropped one of five felony charges against the former Giants star.</p><p>Bonds is accused of lying under oath to the federal grand jury that investigated the BALCO steroids scandal in 2003. He told the grand jury that he had never knowingly used banned drugs, only flaxseed oil and arthritis balm supplied by his trainer, Greg Anderson. Bonds pleaded not guilty.</p><p>Count four of the indictment accused Bonds of lying when he said Anderson had never provided him with anything other than vitamins before the year 2003. His answer came during questioning about whether the trainer had been providing Bonds with &ldquo;the cream&rdquo; and &ldquo;the clear,&rdquo; designer steroids from the Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative in Burlingame.</p><p>Earlier, the judge said she was thinking of dismissing the count because the interchange seemed to refer only to the BALCO drugs, and there was no evidence that Bonds was using those drugs until 2003.</p><p>Prosecutors argued the question and answer could also refer to other steroids provided by Anderson. But then they withdrew the charge. Now Bonds faces three charges of lying under oath and one charge of obstruction of justice.</p><p>In more than two weeks of trial, prosecutors called a dozen key witnesses &ndash; other baseball players, doping scientists and former Bonds confidants &ndash; in an effort to prove that the former Giants star used steroids and lied about it. Bonds was using banned drugs in 2001 when he set the single-season home run record, the government says.</p><p>One positive drug test &ndash; from Major League Baseball&rsquo;s 2003 steroid testing program &ndash; is in evidence. It showed that Bonds was using &ldquo;the clear,&rdquo; a form of artificial testosterone, and the female fertility drug clomid, used by male steroid users.</p><p>Also in evidence are portions of a 2003 recording of Anderson in the Giants clubhouse discussing the banned drugs he said he was giving to Bonds.</p><p>At the beginning of the trial, defense lawyer Ruby told the jury that Bonds &ldquo;told the truth&rdquo; and &ldquo;provided the grand jury with useful information&rdquo; during his testimony in 2003. Ruby said Bonds had been falsely accused of drug use by &ldquo;bitter&rdquo;&nbsp;former confidants &ndash; Steve Hoskins, his onetime business manager, and Kimberly Bell, his former girlfriend.</p><p>Both underwent intense, prolonged cross-examination aimed at casting doubt on their stories and suggesting they were trying to settle old scores with Bonds through false testimony.</p><p>Bonds&rsquo; team seems to like the way the case has unfolded, said San Francisco lawyer William Keane, who defended track coach Trevor Graham in a steroids-related case that parallels that of Bonds.</p><p>&quot;Calling no witnesses suggests that the defense is relatively satisfied at this point in the trial and did not want to embrace the risk that is&nbsp;always inherent when you start presenting your own witnesses,&rdquo; the trial observer said.</p><p>Keane said Bonds&rsquo; biggest concern may be the count of the indictment concerning his testimony that he had never received an injection from anyone but a physician. The slugger&rsquo;s former personal shopper, Kathy Hoskins, told the jury she saw Anderson inject Bonds in the abdomen in 2002.</p><p>She had &ldquo;the least amount of baggage&rdquo; of the Bonds confidants who testified, Keane said. And that&rsquo;s the one count that doesn&rsquo;t require the government to prove that Bonds knowingly took a banned substance, he said.</p><p>&ldquo;&#39;Knowingly&#39; is a non-issue,&rdquo; Keane said. &ldquo;If Anderson indeed injected Bonds, he knows it.&quot;</p><p>Also Wednesday, Anderson, who was imprisoned for contempt of court because he refused to testify, asked the judge to set him free because testimony had ended. The legal motion was filed by his lawyer, Mark Geragos. The government said it wanted him imprisoned until a verdict is reached. The judge made no immediate ruling.</p><p><br /> &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9662&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Thu, 07 Apr 2011 02:07:16 +0000 Lance Williams 9662 at http://californiawatch.org artalog/Flickr Prosecution rests in Barry Bonds' perjury trial http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/prosecution-rests-barry-bonds-perjury-trial-9640 <p>Prosecutors rested their perjury case against Barry Bonds today after the judge refused to let the jury hear a secret tape of the slugger&rsquo;s ex-business manager and his surgeon discussing the BALCO steroids raid.</p><p>In more than two weeks of trial, the government called more than a dozen witnesses &ndash; baseball players, doping scientists and onetime Bonds confidants &nbsp;&ndash; in an effort to prove that the former Giants star lied when he told a grand jury in 2003 that he had never knowingly used banned drugs.</p><p>Bonds pleaded not guilty to four charges of lying under oath and one charge of obstruction of justice.</p><p>After prosecutor Matthew Parrella said the government had no more witnesses, lead defense lawyer Allen Ruby told Judge Susan Illston, &ldquo;If Mr. Bonds testifies, it will be tomorrow.&rdquo; He was smiling when he said it.</p><p>Prosecutors wrapped up their presentation to the jury by having court personnel read the transcript that is at the heart of the case &ndash; Bonds&rsquo; December 2003 testimony before the grand jury that investigated the sports steroids scandal at the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative in Burlingame.</p><p>In three hours of sparring with prosecutors, Bonds repeatedly denied using banned drugs.</p><p>He said his weight trainer, Greg Anderson, had never given him a steroid, and said he had never gotten an injection from anyone except a physician. At another point, he said he had never received human growth hormone from Anderson.</p><p>Further, he said that before 2003 Anderson had never provided him with &ldquo;anything&rdquo; other than vitamins. The answer came in response to queries about BALCO&rsquo;s designer steroids, &ldquo;the cream&rdquo; and &ldquo;the clear.&rdquo;</p><p>Bonds was charged with a felony for each of those statements.</p><p>Prosecutors contend that Anderson gave Bonds both injectable drugs and BALCO steroids. Bonds said he thought he was getting only flaxseed oil and arthritis balm from the trainer. The judge ordered Anderson imprisoned for contempt of court because he refused to testify in the trial.</p><p>Late Tuesday, the judge said she was inclined to pare back the government&rsquo;s evidence some more.&nbsp;She said she was thinking of throwing out testimony from Bonds&rsquo; ex-girlfriend, Kimberly Bell, suggesting that Bonds had suffered atrophy of his testicles. The judge said the government hadn&rsquo;t sufficiently proved that occurred or that it was a side effect of steroid use.</p><p>The judge also said she was likely to cut more passages from a 2003 tape of Anderson in the Giants clubhouse discussing the undetectable drugs he said he was giving Bonds. That&rsquo;s because it is a &ldquo;close question&rdquo; whether the BALCO designer steroid<strong> </strong>THG, also known as &quot;the clear,&quot; was illegal in 2003, she said.</p><p>She also said she was likely to drop the count of the indictment referring to whether Anderson provided Bonds with<strong> </strong>&ldquo;anything&rdquo; prior to 2003. The only evidence in the trial that ties Bonds to the use of BALCO drugs is from 2003, she said.</p><p>The prosecutors urged her to reconsider. The judge said she would rule tomorrow.</p><p>Earlier today, the judge&nbsp;excluded from evidence a secret tape of a 2003 discussion about Bonds and steroids that involved the slugger&rsquo;s former business manager, Steve Hoskins, and his surgeon, Dr. Arthur Ting.</p><p>The judge said the recording, which the government said was discovered Sunday night, was &ldquo;barely intelligible.&rdquo;&nbsp;The judge also said that the last-minute discovery of the tape made her concerned that its use would violate Bonds&rsquo; right to a fair trial.</p><p>Hoskins, Bonds&rsquo; business manager until a bitter 2003 breakup, testified earlier in the trial that he had spent years trying to persuade Bonds to stop using steroids.&nbsp;As part of that effort, he said he talked frequently about Bonds&rsquo; alleged use of steroids to Ting, Bonds&rsquo; orthopedist.</p><p>He testified he had secretly taped one such discussion, but couldn&rsquo;t find the recording.</p><p>When the government called Ting to the witness stand, the doctor flatly denied he had ever talked to Hoskins about Bonds and steroids. Hoskins told the government he had found the recording Sunday night on the flip side of a used cassette. The government wanted to use it as evidence that Hoskins had told the truth.</p><p>A transcript was filed with the court. It showed that &ndash; despite Ting&rsquo;s denials on the witness stand &ndash; the physician had discussed Bonds and steroids with Hoskins.</p><p>In the conversation, Hoskins described the September 2003 federal raid on BALCO and said BALCO records might implicate Bonds in steroid use, the transcript shows.</p><p>Most of Ting&rsquo;s remarks on the recording are unintelligible, according to the transcript. But it indicates he participated in the conversation, referring to Bonds by his first name and at one point acknowledging that he knew BALCO proprietor Victor Conte, who later pleaded guilty to steroid dealing.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F9640&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Public Safety Daily Report BALCO Barry Bonds perjury trial steroids Barry Bonds Wed, 06 Apr 2011 01:39:59 +0000 Lance Williams 9640 at http://californiawatch.org U.S. District Court