California Watch: Tainted Jewelry http://californiawatch.org/project/tainted-jewelry/feed en California Watch debuts children’s videos on dangers of lead http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/california-watch-debuts-children-s-videos-dangers-lead-16911 <p>My job is fun. Don&rsquo;t get me wrong. It&rsquo;s tough. It&rsquo;s exhausting. But it&rsquo;s also pretty darn awesome. That&rsquo;s especially true when it comes to the different children-oriented projects I&rsquo;ve led during my first two years at the Center for Investigative Reporting.</p><p>The center and its projects &ndash; California Watch and The Bay Citizen &ndash; focus on solution-oriented reporting with the potential to improve people&rsquo;s quality of life.</p><p>Our work does not end with the publication of an investigation. We want to ensure those most affected get the information they need to better understand and address the issue.&nbsp;</p><p>With a California Watch&nbsp;series on earthquake safety at California schools,&nbsp;that meant engaging children. Working with an education specialist from the Red Cross of Los Angeles, I wrote a coloring book aimed at teaching children about earthquake safety.</p><p>Earlier this year, we debuted a <a href="http://californiawatch.org/kids">section</a> on its website dedicated exclusively to children. That&rsquo;s where you&rsquo;ll find an interactive version of the coloring book, a map of where Sunny the California Watchdog &ndash;&nbsp;our little mascot &ndash; has traveled and puppet show videos. The first of these videos relates to many California Watch stories and teaches children about clean water.</p><p>Today, we launch a new <a href="http://californiawatch.org/kids/lead">video</a>, and it has roots in the Bay Area. Two years ago, <a href="http://californiawatch.org/user/joanna-lin">Joanna Lin</a> and <a href="http://californiawatch.org/user/mandy-hofmockel" title="View user profile.">Mandy Hofmockel</a> reported on Rainbow Apparel, a national retailer the state had repeatedly cited for selling lead-tainted jewelry. In our new video &ndash; Junior Watchdogs: Keeping Kids Safe from Lead &ndash; Sunny talks to children about the potential dangers of lead and the need to keep jewelry out of their mouths. It&rsquo;s a quick, fun watch. And you can check it out below or on our <a href="http://californiawatch.org/kids">Junior Watchdogs</a> section on our website.</p><p>Speak Spanish? Haz cliq <a href="http://californiawatch.org/cuidado">aquí</a> para verlo en español.</p> Health and Welfare Newsroom Tainted Jewelry Tue, 03 Jul 2012 07:05:03 +0000 Ashley Alvarado 16911 at http://californiawatch.org React & Act: Why should I be concerned about lead in jewelry? http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/react-act-why-should-i-be-concerned-about-lead-jewelry-14321 <p><strong>Frequently Asked Questions</strong></p><p><strong>What are the laws for lead in jewelry?</strong><br /> It&#39;s against the law in California to make, ship or sell jewelry that contains dangerous levels of lead. Children&rsquo;s jewelry &ndash; defined as items designed or intended primarily for children age 12 or younger &ndash; is regulated under the federal <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/sect101.html" target="_blank">Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act</a>, which limits lead to 300 parts per million, or 0.03 percent lead by weight. In California, though, there are restrictions for lead in all jewelry, not just items meant for children. Lead limits vary by material but are all less than 60,000 ppm, or 6 percent lead by weight. You can download a <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/HazardousWaste/Jewelry/upload/jewelry-fact-sheet-052710.pdf" target="_blank">fact sheet [PDF]</a>&nbsp;about California&rsquo;s jewelry law from the <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a>.</p><p><strong>Why should I be concerned about lead in jewelry?</strong><br /> Long-term lead exposure can damage the nervous system and is especially hazardous for children. At high levels, the metal can severely damage the brain and kidneys, and cause reproductive problems and even death. The <a href="http://www.epa.gov" target="_blank">Environmental Protection Agency</a>&nbsp;says lead is a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/TF.asp?id=93&amp;tid=22" target="_blank">probable human carcinogen</a>. Although jewelry is not a leading source of lead exposure, dangerous amounts of the heavy metal can spread through the bloodstream if jewelry is swallowed or chewed on. You can be exposed to lead if, after handling jewelry with lead on its surface, you put your hands to your mouth or touch food that you eat. Health and safety advocates recommend keeping jewelry away from young children.</p><p><strong>How can I tell whether my jewelry contains high levels of lead? </strong><br /> You cannot tell whether jewelry contains lead by its appearance, brand, retailer or price. The only way to determine whether your jewelry contains lead is to test it.</p><p>The <a href="http://www.ceh.org" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>, an Oakland nonprofit that routinely tests jewelry, says high lead levels are often found among the following kinds of jewelry:</p><ul><li>dull-looking metal</li><li>fake pearls with pearlescent coating</li><li>plastic or vinyl cords or bracelets</li><li>lobster-claw clasps</li></ul><p>You can see samples of jewelry with high levels of lead online at the <a href="http://www.ceh.org/index.php?option=com_content&amp;task=view&amp;id=344&amp;Itemid=246" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>&nbsp;and the <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/Toxic-Jewelry-Samples.cfm" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a>. You can search the <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov" target="_blank">Consumer Product Safety Commission</a>&nbsp;website for <a href="http://cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prerel.html" target="_blank">recalls</a>&nbsp;of children&rsquo;s jewelry. Searching for lead under <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/cgi-bin/haz.aspx" target="_blank">hazard type</a>&nbsp;yields the most comprehensive list.</p><p><strong>How can I test my jewelry for lead?</strong><br /> You can screen jewelry for lead and other heavy metals by using an X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The screening is not as precise as a laboratory test but can accurately tell you whether your jewelry has high lead levels. The equipment costs thousands of dollars to buy or rent. But there are a few ways you can get your jewelry screened using the equipment for free:</p><p>California Watch is holding three <a href="http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/worried-about-your-jewelry-california-watch-offers-free-testing-5119">free screenings</a> that are open to the public:</p><blockquote><p>Wednesday, Oct. 3<br /> 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.<br /> De Colores Head Start at Fruitvale Village<br /> 1155 35th Ave., Oakland <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;source=s_q&amp;hl=en&amp;geocode=&amp;q=1155+35th+Ave.,+Oakland,+CA&amp;sll=37.0625,-95.677068&amp;sspn=39.729049,78.134766&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=1155+35th+Ave,+Oakland,+Alameda,+California+94601&amp;z=16" target="_blank">[MAP]</a><br /> * Located next to the Fruitvale BART station</p><p>Sunday, Oct. 10<br /> 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.<br /> Richmond Flea Market<br /> 716 W. Gertrude Ave., Richmond&nbsp;<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;source=s_q&amp;hl=en&amp;geocode=&amp;q=716+W.+Gertrude+Ave.,+Richmond,+CA&amp;sll=37.774938,-122.223566&amp;sspn=0.004673,0.009538&amp;dirflg=r&amp;ttype=dep&amp;date=09%2F27%2F10&amp;time=6:26pm&amp;noexp=0&amp;noal=0&amp;sort=&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=716+W+Gertrude+Ave,+Richmond,+Contra+Costa,+California+94801&amp;ll=37.953876,-122.361946&amp;spn=0.009678,0.019076&amp;z=16&amp;start=0" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 70, 100); background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; " target="_blank">[MAP]</a></p><p>Thursday, Oct. 14<br /> Noon to 6 p.m.<br /> Nahui Ohlin<br /> 1511 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles&nbsp;<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=1511+W.+Sunset+Blvd.,+Los+Angeles,+CA&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=1511+W+Sunset+Blvd,+Los+Angeles,+California+90026&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=GIijTLz-HZC8sAPZpaH6Bg&amp;ved=0CBMQ8gEwAA&amp;z=16" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; outline-width: 0px; outline-style: initial; outline-color: initial; font-size: 13px; vertical-align: baseline; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: transparent; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 70, 100); border-style: initial; border-color: initial; background-position: initial initial; background-repeat: initial initial; " target="_blank">[MAP]</a></p></blockquote><p>The <a href="http://www.ceh.og" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>&nbsp;offers screenings at its office from noon to 6 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday. It also accepts jewelry by mail. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope if you want your jewelry returned to you. The center asks that you include information about where and when you purchased the jewelry and a copy of the receipt, if available. The center is at 2201 Broadway, Ste. 302, Oakland, CA, 94612. Questions may be directed to Ryan Nestle at <a href="mailto:ryan@ceh.org">ryan@ceh.org</a>&nbsp;or 510.655-3900, ext. 310.</p><p>The <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a>&nbsp;sometimes hosts public screening events, but none are currently scheduled.</p><p>Home testing kits that use swabs to check for lead are generally not recommended for jewelry analysis. Lead in jewelry is often beneath the surface and difficult to swab, making it more likely that tests will produce false negatives.</p><p>To determine the exact quantity of lead in jewelry, an item must be analyzed in a lab. California law uses testing methods 3050B, 3051A, and 3052, as set by the <a href="http://www.epa.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a>. The tests destroy jewelry so it cannot be recovered. The <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov/" target="_blank">California Department of Public Health</a>&nbsp;lists accredited labs <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov/certlic/labs/Pages/ELAP.aspx" target="_blank">here</a>.</p><p><strong>Where do I report jewelry with high levels of lead?</strong></p><p>The <a href="ceh.org" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>&nbsp;works with the state attorney general and other government agencies to report jewelry with high levels of lead. You can contact Ryan Nestle at the center at <a href="mailto:ryan@ceh.org">ryan@ceh.org</a>&nbsp;or 510.655-3900, ext. 310.</p><p>Complaints about possible jewelry violations can be directed to the <a href="dtsc.ca.gov" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a>&nbsp;at <a href="mailto:leadinjewelry@dtsc.ca.gov">leadinjewelry@dtsc.ca.gov</a>&nbsp;or by calling 800.698-6942. You can also <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/database/CalEPA_Complaint/index.cfm" target="_blank">file a complaint online</a>. Under &ldquo;Complaint Related To&rdquo; on the form, check &ldquo;Toxic Substances&rdquo; to make sure it reaches the department.</p><p>You can report jewelry with high levels of lead to the <a href="http://ag.ca.gov/" target="_blank">California attorney general&rsquo;s Public Inquiry Unit</a>&nbsp;at 916.322-3360.</p><p>You can <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/talk.html" target="_blank">report unsafe children&rsquo;s jewelry</a>&nbsp;at the <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/" target="_blank">Consumer Product Safety Commission</a>&nbsp;website.</p><p><strong>What are the symptoms of lead poisoning?</strong><br /> Lead poisoning symptoms are often absent or develop over time with chronic exposure. Common symptoms include stomachaches, headaches, fatigue, vomiting and loss of appetite. Children may also have learning difficulties or behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity. The only way to know whether you or your child has lead poisoning is to get a blood test.</p><p><strong>Where can I get tested for lead exposure?</strong><br /> Your health care provider can tell you more about lead tests. The state requires health care providers to screen children ages 1 and 2 who are in public programs such as Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. Children should also get tested if they live in or spend a lot of time in homes built before 1978 where lead paint may be present. You can also contact your local public health department or <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/CLPPB/Pages/CLPPPIndex.aspx" target="_blank">lead poisoning prevention program</a>&nbsp;for more information.</p><p><strong>I bought jewelry from Rainbow Apparel that has high levels of lead. What should I do?</strong><br /> Health and safety advocates recommend keeping jewelry away from young children. Rainbow will accept returns of any jewelry identified in a violation notice for a full refund if you have the receipt. If you do not have the receipt, Rainbow will refund your jewelry at the current or last selling price.</p><p><strong>Helpful resources:</strong><br /> The <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/LeadInJewelry.cfm" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a>&nbsp;has information about lead in jewelry on its <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/LeadInJewelry.cfm" target="_blank">website</a>.</p><p>The <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov" target="_blank">Department of Public Health</a>&nbsp;has information about the <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/CLPPBChildrenAtRisk.aspx" target="_blank">dangers of lead</a>&nbsp;to children and <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/CLPPB/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">lead poisoning prevention</a>.</p><p>You can find <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/" target="_blank">data and information</a>&nbsp;about lead exposure and prevention at the <a href="http://www.cdc.gov" target="_blank">U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a>.</p><p>The <a href="ceh.org" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>&nbsp;has information about <a href="http://www.ceh.org/index.php?option=com_content&amp;task=view&amp;id=38&amp;Itemid=53" target="_blank">lead in jewelry</a>&nbsp;and a list of companies and brands that have agreed to California&rsquo;s lead standards.</p><p><strong>Key contacts</strong><br /> California Office of the Attorney General<br /> Website: <a href="http://ag.ca.gov" target="_blank">www.ag.ca.gov</a><br /> Phone: 800.952-5225<br /> Mail: Attorney General&rsquo;s Office<br /> California Department of Justice<br /> Attn: Public Inquiry Unit<br /> P.O. Box 944255<br /> Sacramento, CA 94244-2550</p><p>Center for Environmental Health<br /> Website: <a href="http://www.ceh.org" target="_blank">www.ceh.org</a><br /> E-mail: <a href="http://www.ceh.org/index.php?option=com_contact&amp;task=view&amp;contact_id=2&amp;Itemid=10" target="_blank">www.ceh.org/index.php?option=com_contact&amp;task=view&amp;contact_id=2&amp;Itemid=10</a><br /> Phone: 510.655-3900<br /> Mail: 2201 Broadway, Ste. 302<br /> Oakland, CA 94612<br /> Facebook:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.facebook.com/centerforenvironmentalhealth" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/centerforenvironmentalhealth</a><br /> Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/4envirohealth" target="_blank">@4EnviroHealth</a></p><p>California Department of Toxic Substances Control<br /> Website: <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov" target="_blank">www.dtsc.ca.gov</a><br /> Phone: 800.728-6942<br /> Mail: P.O. Box 806<br /> Sacramento, CA 95812-0806<br /> Facebook: <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sacramento-CA/DTSC-The-Department-of-Toxic-Substances-Control/109412255835" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/pages/Sacramento-CA/DTSC-The-Department-of-Toxic-Substances-Control/109412255835</a><br /> Twitter: <a href="http://www.twitter.com/enviro_squawk" target="_blank">@enviro_squawk</a></p><p>U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission<br /> Website: <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov" target="_blank">www.cpsc.gov</a><br /> E-mail: <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/cgibin/info.aspx" target="_blank">www.cpsc.gov/cgibin/info.aspx</a><br /> Phone: 800.638-2772<br /> Mail: 4330 East West Highway<br /> Bethesda, MD 20814<br /> En español: <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/spanish/spanish.html" target="_blank">www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/spanish/spanish.html</a><br /> Twitter: <a href="http://www.twitter.com/OnSafety" target="_blank">@OnSafety</a></p><p>California Department of Public Health<br /> Website: <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov" target="_blank">www.cdph.ca.gov</a><br /> E-mail: <a href="http://www.cdph.ca.gov/_layouts/dhs/sitecomments/default.aspx" target="_blank">www.cdph.ca.gov/_layouts/dhs/sitecomments/default.aspx</a><br /> Phone: 916.558-1784<br /> Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/capublichealth" target="_blank">@CAPublicHealth</a></p><p>U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention<br /> Website: <a href="http://www.cdc.gov" target="_blank">www.cdc.gov</a><br /> E-mail: <a href="mailto:cdcinfo@cdc.gov">cdcinfo@cdc.gov</a><br /> Phone: 800.232-4636<br /> Mail: 1600 Clifton Road<br /> Atlanta, GA 30333<br /> En español: <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/spanish" target="_blank">www.cdc.gov/spanish</a><br /> Facebook: <a href="http://www.facebook.com/CDC" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/CDC</a><br /> Twitter: <a href="http://www.twitter.com/CDCgov" target="_blank">@CDCgov</a></p><p>U.S. Environmental Protection Agency<br /> Website: <a href="http://www.epa.gov" target="_blank">www.epa.gov</a><br /> E-mail/Phone: List of contacts available at <a href="http://www.epa.gov/epahome/hotline.htm" target="_blank">www.epa.gov/epahome/hotline.htm</a><br /> En español: <a href="http://www.epa.gov/espanol" target="_blank">www.epa.gov/espanol</a><br /> Facebook: <a href="http://www.facebook.com/EPA" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/EPA</a><br /> Twitter: <a href="http://www.twitter.com/epagov">@epagov</a></p> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Wed, 04 Jan 2012 22:00:14 +0000 Ashley Alvarado 14321 at http://californiawatch.org Law will allow fines for all lead-tainted jewelry http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/law-will-allow-fines-all-lead-tainted-jewelry-13006 <p>California has imposed&nbsp;fines on retailers and suppliers that sell lead-tainted jewelry since 2007, but because of a provision in state law, dozens of companies have not had to pay. Come January, under a bill Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law last week, all violations of the state&#39;s jewelry regulations will warrant penalties.</p><p>The bill, by Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Santa Monica, followed a <a href="http://californiawatch.org/lead-jewelry" target="_blank">California Watch investigation</a> that found that more than 200 retailers and suppliers faced virtually no financial penalties for selling jewelry with illegal levels of lead &ndash; even if they did so repeatedly.</p><p>Pavley said she anticipates <a href="http://leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/bill/sen/sb_0601-0650/sb_646_bill_20111004_chaptered.html" target="_blank">SB 646</a> will make companies more vigilant in ensuring their jewelry meets state standards.</p><p>&quot;I&#39;m confident now that, with all companies facing the threat of financial penalties, we can better safeguard our most vulnerable citizens from the dangers of lead,&quot; she said in a statement issued to California Watch.</p><p>Children are particularly vulnerable to lead, a neurotoxin that can damage the nervous system, brain, kidneys and reproductive system.</p><p>California&#39;s original lead-in-jewelry law, which Pavley authored five years ago, created dual enforcement tracks: one for primarily large companies that signed a settlement with the state and one for everyone else.&nbsp;</p><p>Companies that signed the settlement agreed to strict lead limits that became the basis of the state&#39;s law. They paid $2.6 million to establish a jewelry testing fund and are not fined for violations as long as they promptly remove unlawful jewelry from their stores.</p><p>Under limited circumstances, companies can be fined if they incur several violations involving the same supplier in a short time. But no company &ndash; including the subject of California Watch&#39;s investigation, Rainbow Apparel, which was cited for 28 violations in 18 months &ndash; has met this threshold.</p><p>For all other companies, many of which are too small to join the settlement, violations carry fines of up to $2,500 a day and up to $100,000 if they are intentional.</p><p>SB 646 undercuts the very reason companies signed the state&#39;s settlement, said Brent Cleaveland, executive director of the Fashion Jewelry and Accessories Trade Association.</p><p>Companies settled &quot;so they could become part of the solution and be absolved from having their products in contention,&quot; he said.&nbsp;&quot;To go and penalize them every time they find an infraction isn&#39;t solving the problem.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t think it will make jewelry any safer,&quot; Cleaveland added.&nbsp;For companies that have been cited repeatedly for violations, he said &quot;time and diligence&quot; eventually would bring compliance.</p><p>The state attorney general&#39;s office has cited dozens of companies for failing to meet state standards. It cited 40&nbsp;companies as of the end of last year, the most recent date available, and repeat offenders were responsible for the majority of violations, said Lynda Gledhill, spokeswoman for the attorney general.</p><p>Those violations rarely resulted in financial penalties. The office has collected less than $25,000 in fines &ndash; all incurred because offenders failed to respond to violations in a timely manner.</p><p>The state Department of Toxic Substances Control, which enforces cases outside the settlement, issued violations to 32 companies as of February 2011. It has collected more than $21,000 in fines,&nbsp;said department spokeswoman Charlotte Fadipe.</p><p>When SB 646 takes effect Jan. 1, there will be just one track for enforcement. The Department of Toxic Substances Control will&nbsp;have the authority to enforce the state&#39;s regulations &ndash; and impose potential fines &ndash; on any jewelry retailer or supplier.</p><p>The shift comes as the state&#39;s jewelry testing fund nears depletion.&nbsp;The Center for Environmental Health, a watchdog group that on the state&#39;s behalf has regularly tested jewelry sold by companies in the settlement, will run its final tests for the fund next summer.</p><p>The center will have less capacity to test jewelry after the fund runs out, said Caroline Cox, the group&#39;s research director. The toxic substances control department&nbsp;will not necessarily assume the center&#39;s role in testing jewelry specifically from companies in the settlement, but it will continue testing under its overall enforcement efforts, Fadipe said.</p><p>Although the number of violations has declined dramatically over the course of the fund, the need to test for compliance has not disappeared, Cox said.</p><p>&quot;My guess is there will continue to be violations, just because there&#39;s a lot of jewelry out there,&quot; she said. &quot;There are still problematic jewelry components that&nbsp;&hellip; end up in jewelry, and they end up in stores.&quot;</p> Health and Welfare Daily Report Fran Pavley Jerry Brown jewelry lead Tainted Jewelry Tue, 11 Oct 2011 07:05:03 +0000 Joanna Lin 13006 at http://californiawatch.org Max Talbot-Minkin/Flickr Starting in January, all companies can be fined for selling lead-tainted jewelry in California. Lead-tainted jewelry item found at flea market http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/lead-tainted-jewelry-item-found-flea-market-5888 <p>Every Sunday, the Richmond Flea Market hosts more than 5,000 people looking for good bargains and cheap eats. From jumbles of clothes to miscellaneous computer parts, live chickens and puppies, shoppers can find just about anything &ndash; including jewelry.</p><p>Earlier this month, I reported that the state attorney general had <a href="http://californiawatch.org/lead-jewelry" target="_blank">repeatedly cited Rainbow Apparel</a>, a national retailer with 35 stores in California, for selling jewelry with lead above legal limits.&nbsp;Although the majority of jewelry sold in California today meets state and federal standards &ndash; jewelry tests by the Center for Environmental Health last year found 96 percent compliance &ndash; some items can slip through the cracks.</p><p>Flea markets and thrift shops are subject to the same jewelry laws as big box stores like Walmart. But state and federal regulators largely skip over items sold at these venues, saying resources limit their enforcement to new, mass-produced jewelry.</p><p>So when California Watch recently <a href="http://californiawatch.org/watchblog/lead-screenings-provide-new-platform-public-engagement-5886" target="_blank">held a public jewelry screening</a> at the Richmond Flea Market, I did some shopping. I bought 24 pieces of jewelry &ndash; a mix of vintage and newer costume items, ranging from $1 to $10 each &ndash; to test with our rented X-ray fluorescence analyzer.</p><p>The results: Only one item, a silver bee pendant that was 6.2 percent lead, screened above legal limits for adult jewelry. Several items had more than 0.03 percent lead &ndash; the standard for children&#39;s products &ndash; but might not fit the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission&#39;s <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/29/business/29toys.html" target="_blank">definition of a children&#39;s product</a>.</p><p>Six items were labeled either &quot;lead free&quot; or &quot;lead safe,&quot; but only two actually contained no lead. But the items with lead may have been within legal limits.</p><p>I asked Charles Margulis, a spokesman for the <a href="http://www.ceh.org" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>, an Oakland nonprofit that routinely tests jewelry for consumers and the state, whether such labels meant that items were completely without lead or that their lead content met legal limits.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t think there&#39;s any defined standard for what you can label &#39;lead free&#39; or &#39;lead safe,&#39;&quot; Margulis said. &quot;They make it up as they go along. If there&#39;s no standard, it&#39;s a relatively meaningless term.&quot;</p><p>Just as you cannot rely on labels to know if jewelry is safe, neither can you rely on appearance. I looked for items that the center often finds containing lead &ndash; dull-looking metals, fake pearls with pearlescent coating, plastic or vinyl cords, and lobster-claw clasps &ndash; and found that some were clean and others tainted.</p><p>For example, I thought a vintage silver bangle with intricate designs might screen high for lead. Jewelry makers like using lead because it&#39;s pliable and facilitates detailed designs. Tests showed it contained no lead.</p><p>But a similarly intricate vintage charm bracelet had as much as 1 percent lead &ndash; more than what&#39;s allowed for children&#39;s jewelry, but well within legal limits for adult jewelry.</p><p>Vintage items are not a priority for the <a href="http://cpsc.gov" target="_blank">Consumer Product Safety Commission</a>, which regulates only children&#39;s jewelry.</p><p>&quot;Children are not normally going to be wearing vintage jewelry,&quot; said Patty Davis, an agency spokeswoman.</p><p>Davis said a bigger concern for flea markets would be vendors selling recalled items. She would not say whether the commission targets flea markets for enforcement.</p><p>&quot;I can tell you what we&#39;re not doing,&quot; she said. &quot;We&#39;re not going to go to individual yard sales. We don&#39;t have the resources for that.&quot; (But yard sales must still meet product safety standards &ndash; see page 2 of this <a href="http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=0CB0QFjAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cpsc.gov%2Fcpscpub%2Fpubs%2Fthrift%2Fthrguid.pdf&amp;rct=j&amp;q=site%3Acpsc.gov%20yard%20sale&amp;ei=J0K-TJi0KYK-sAPngMGWDQ&amp;usg=AFQjCNHKJ6dSjmeLIOH259Z69-uVoIc0ZQ&amp;sig2=zuDQzscRi_lOmzL895H0hQ" target="_blank">commission handbook [PDF]</a>&nbsp;for resellers.)</p><p>The Center for Environmental Health keeps its testing efforts to major retailers.</p><p>&quot;We don&#39;t have the resources,&quot; Margulis said. &quot;We&#39;re looking to make change on a national level when at all possible, and there are no national flea market vendors that I&#39;m familiar with.&quot;</p><p>Same goes for the&nbsp;<a href="http://dtsc.ca.gov" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a>, which regulates jewelry in California.&nbsp;Of the dozens of lead violations the agency has issued in the past three years, none concerned vintage items or jewelry sold at flea markets, said Charlotte Fadipe, a department spokeswoman.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5888&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare Daily Report jewelry lead Tainted Jewelry Wed, 20 Oct 2010 07:05:06 +0000 Joanna Lin 5888 at http://californiawatch.org Joanna Lin/California Watch This tail of this dragon fly hair clip, sold at the Richmond Flea Market, was 2.7 percent lead. Joanna Lin/California Watch The back of this bee pendant had more lead than allowed in adult jewelry. Joanna Lin/California Watch These hoop earrings were labeled "lead free" but actually contained some lead. Joanna Lin/California Watch This silver bangle was completely lead-free. California Watch tests new way to engage readers with lead-jewelry project http://californiawatch.org/dailyreport/california-watch-tests-new-way-engage-readers-lead-jewelry-project-5177 <p>Make a difference. Innovate. Engage communities.</p><p>That&rsquo;s what we&rsquo;re trying to do at California Watch. Our ultimate goal is to produce high-impact stories that prompt change, serve the public and reach audiences in new ways.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>So we are especially proud of our story this past weekend on <a href="http://californiawatch.org/lead-jewelry" target="_blank">lead threats in jewelry</a>. We think it meets the goals we have set internally for our biggest projects.</p><p>Reporters <a href="/user/joanna-lin" target="_blank">Joanna Lin</a> and <a href="/user/mandy-hofmockel" target="_blank">Mandy Hofmockel</a> detailed how California regulators have hit a national retailer with five violation notices in a span of 16 months for repeatedly selling jewelry containing illegal levels of lead.</p><p>The dangers of lead in jewelry may not sound like a new story. But if you think the problem has been eliminated, you&rsquo;d be sadly mistaken.&nbsp;</p><p>The toxic metal is especially harmful to young children and women who are pregnant.&nbsp;Prolonged exposure to lead can cause developmental issues, including stunted growth and brain damage.&nbsp;High levels of lead can still be found in all kinds of consumer products, such as toys, children&#39;s lunch boxes and even candy.</p><p>The case of Rainbow Apparel, with <a href="http://californiawatch.org/data/map-rainbow-has-35-california-stores-impacted-lead-violation-notices" target="_blank">35 stores throughout California</a>, illustrates the persistent threat of lead. As Lin and Hofmockel wrote, &ldquo;Just as tainted items are removed, a new wave of dangerous necklaces, pendants and bracelets takes their place.&rdquo;</p><p>After state regulators issued a fourth violation notice in June, Lin and Hofmockel went shopping. They bought 30 jewelry items at Rainbow stores in the Bay Area and <a href="http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/testing-jewelry-lead-hazards-5004" target="_blank">sent them off for testing</a>. Six of the <a href="http://californiawatch.org/slideshow-results-30-items-tested-california-watch-5055" target="_blank">jewelry pieces</a>, or 20 percent of the items purchased, contained unlawful levels of lead. &nbsp;</p><p>Our reporting produced results before a single word was published. When we told Rainbow about our testing results, the chain ordered all of its stores across the country &ndash; more than 1,100 stores in all &ndash; to pull the lead-tainted items off shelves.</p><p>That&rsquo;s good news for consumers. And it&rsquo;s the kind of results we hope to attain via our best journalism.</p><p>But we felt we could do more with this story to engage consumers.</p><p>To that end, California Watch is sponsoring <a href="http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/worried-about-your-jewelry-california-watch-will-screen-it-you-5119" target="_blank">three lead screening events</a> over the next 10 days &ndash; one in Oakland, one in Richmond and one in Los Angeles. Our public engagement manager, <a href="/user/ashley-alvarado" target="_blank">Ashley Alvarado,</a> organized these events. The first will be tomorrow in Oakland.</p><p>Consumers who have bought jewelry from any retailer &ndash; whether it&rsquo;s a big chain, a sidewalk vendor or at a flea market &ndash; are welcome to bring jewelry to any of our screening locations for tests that will yield results in a matter of minutes. If you&rsquo;re a parent worried about the bracelet your toddler has been putting in his or her mouth, this is a chance to get some answers.</p><p>California Watch staff have been trained to use an X-ray fluorescence device, the same equipment that state regulators rely upon to perform initial lead screening exams. We are renting the device from <a href="http://www.quickshotxrf.com/steel-grade-pmi" target="_blank">QuickShot XRF</a>. Buying one would cost $24,000, roughly the price of a new Prius. The equipment is not terribly complicated to use &ndash; but the price tag puts these tests out of reach for most Californians.</p><p>State regulators and the <a href="http://www.ceh.org/index.php" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a>, which performed the initial lead screens on the items we bought at Rainbow, also perform free lead screenings. But we thought it would be a good idea to hold our own screening events in conjunction with the publication of our story. We hope the heightened awareness around our reporting will boost participation.</p><p>The tests are very reliable but may not yield conclusive results. For our story, we sent items that screened positive for lead to a separate laboratory, <a href="http://www.forensica.com/" target="_blank">Forensics Analytical</a> in Hayward, to confirm the findings. In every case, the results from the initial screening stood up.</p><p>We&rsquo;re counting on our news partners that have published or broadcast our story to help get the word out about the lead screenings in their area.</p><p>Our screening events will be held in culturally diverse neighborhoods where risks for elevated blood-lead levels tend to be higher. It&rsquo;s a prime opportunity to demonstrate our commitment to solution-oriented reporting while raising awareness about California Watch and our public service mission. We will be gathering information from these events that may yield more stories.</p><p>Is this unusual for a media organization? You bet. I spent nearly a quarter century working in newspapers. And I&rsquo;m not sure many traditional media outlets would attempt such an event. But in our small, new media shop, we see it as another way to operate outside the box.</p><p>Is this advocacy? Not at all. With these screenings, we are not pushing any sort of agenda. Rather, we&rsquo;ll be alerting consumers and parents to potential hazards and arming them with the basics they need in order to protect themselves and their children, address and identify the associated health risks, and search out more information independently. That&rsquo;s what any media organization, new or old, ought to be doing.</p><p>Here&rsquo;s the schedule for our upcoming screening events. Hope to see you at one of them.</p><p>Wednesday, Oct. 6<br /> <strong>De Colores Head Start</strong> <strong>at Fruitvale Village</strong><br /> 1155 35th Ave., Oakland<br /> 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.<br /> <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;hs=nS4&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;q=1155+35th+Ave.+Oakland&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=1155+35th+Ave,+Oakland,+CA+94601&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=9DuhTIH4BI2-sQOw0fzAAQ&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=geocode_result&amp;ct=title&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CBgQ8gEwAA" target="_blank">Map</a></p><p>Sunday, Oct. 10<br /> <strong>Richmond Flea Market</strong><br /> 716 W. Gertrude Ave., Richmond<br /> 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.<br /> <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=716+W.+Gertrude+Ave.+Richmond&amp;oe=utf-8&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=716+W+Gertrude+Ave,+Richmond,+CA+94801&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=yzyhTIrjHpHksQPwrdiKAQ&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=geocode_result&amp;ct=title&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CBcQ8gEwAA" target="_blank">Map</a></p><p>Thursday, Oct. 14<br /> <strong>Nahui Ohlin</strong><br /> 1511 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles<br /> Noon to 6 p.m.<br /> <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=1511+W.+Sunset+Blvd.+Echo+Park&amp;oe=utf-8&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=1511+W+Sunset+Blvd,+Los+Angeles,+CA+90026&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=BHKjTMuEDouosAOfy4X6Bg&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=geocode_result&amp;ct=title&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CBMQ8gEwAA" target="_blank">Map</a></p><p><em>California Watch, a project of the Center for Investigative Reporting, is supported by major grants from the California Endowment, </em><em>the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the </em><em>James Irvine Foundation and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.</em></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5177&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Newsroom jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Tue, 05 Oct 2010 07:25:55 +0000 Mark Katches 5177 at http://californiawatch.org Mandy Hofmockel/California Watch A heart-shaped pendant that tested high for lead Mandy Hofmockel/California Watch QuickShot XRF can test jewelry for lead VIDEO: Second, California Watch sends items with highest levels to lab http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/video-second-california-watch-sends-items-highest-levels-lab-4999 <p>Items that exhibited high lead levels during an initial screening at the Center for Environmental Health were sent to Forensic Analytical Laboratory in Hayward for testing. All six items that screened high in the first round, tested high for lead at the lab.</p><p><embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" height="330" src="http://blip.tv/play/hPROgf7ecgA%2Em4v" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="532"></embed></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F4999&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel video Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 20:32:46 +0000 Mandy Hofmockel 4999 at http://californiawatch.org VIDEO: First, California Watch screens items for lead http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/video-first-california-watch-screens-items-lead-4998 <p>California Watch reporters bought 30 items at Rainbow Apparel stores in the Bay Area. The Oakland-based Center for Environmental Health performed initial screens for lead. The group regularly performs lead screenings for the state attorney general.</p><p><embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" height="330" src="http://blip.tv/play/hPROgf2mfwA%2Em4v" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="532"></embed></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F4998&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel video Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 20:32:15 +0000 Mandy Hofmockel 4998 at http://californiawatch.org State repeatedly cites national retailer for selling lead-tainted jewelry http://californiawatch.org/lead-jewelry <p>In May 2009, the California attorney general&rsquo;s office ordered a national retailer with nearly three dozen stores throughout the state to stop selling jewelry with illegal levels of lead.</p><p>Five months later, the state followed up with another warning directed at Rainbow Apparel after finding more lead-tainted jewelry.</p><p>Three months after that came another warning.</p><p>And then another.</p><p>Each time, the state tested products from <a href="http://www.rainbowshops.com/" target="_blank">Rainbow Apparel</a> outlets in the Bay Area and found jewelry that exceeded the limits for lead &ndash; including one silver star-shaped pendant labeled &ldquo;kids&rdquo; and &ldquo;lead free&rdquo; that was more than 2,600 times above the legal threshold.</p><p>Each time<strong>,</strong> the New York-based retailer pledged to immediately remove the tainted jewelry.</p><p>Each time, the state considered the matter closed.</p><p>After the state in June issued its <a href="http://ag.ca.gov/newsalerts/release.php?id=1942" target="_blank">fourth warning</a> in the span of 13 months, California Watch obtained 30 pieces of jewelry from Rainbow Apparel stores in Richmond, Oakland and Emeryville and <a href="http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/testing-jewelry-lead-hazards-5004" target="_blank">sent them to a laboratory for testing</a>.</p><p>The results: more lead.</p><p>Among the six pieces that registered above the legal limit was a pendant that had been part of the June warning letter. It had mistakenly been left on the shelves, a Rainbow attorney said.</p><p>As Americans consume more and more products from China and other countries with weaker consumer safety regulations, the case of Rainbow Apparel shows the persistence of lead contamination and, in turn, the potential dangers for unsuspecting consumers.</p><p>Although much of the regulatory spotlight has shifted to <a href="http://californiawatch.org/watchblog/state-lawmakers-approve-limit-cadmium-jewelry-4289" target="_blank">cadmium</a>, another dangerous metal, lead continues to present challenges for regulators, shoppers and parents. Just as tainted items are removed, a new wave of dangerous necklaces, pendants and bracelets takes their place.</p><p>&ldquo;That&rsquo;s unacceptable,&rdquo; said Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Santa Monica, who wrote California&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=hsc&amp;group=25001-26000&amp;file=25214.1-25214.4.2" target="_blank">lead-in-jewelry law</a> in 2006. Retailers, she said, should do more to ensure their products are safe, including voluntary testing. Rainbow doesn&#39;t typically test jewelry before stocking its shelves.</p><p>A California Watch investigation found other holes in the safety net that is supposed to protect consumers. Consider:</p><ul><li>Violations rarely result in financial penalties &ndash; even when offenders are repeatedly found to sell dangerous products. Despite its recurring problems, Rainbow has not been fined by the state.</li></ul><ul><li>Vendors further down the supply chain aren&rsquo;t always notified about problems with their products. Rainbow officials say the company immediately notifies its vendors when violations arise. But those vendors may not tell their own suppliers, allowing dangerous items to remain in circulation.</li></ul><ul><li>Customers who buy tainted jewelry are left in the dark. Rainbow has not informed its customers that it sold jewelry with high levels of lead, and California law does not require the company to do so.</li></ul><p>As California Watch was preparing to publish this story, the state last month issued the retailer a fifth violation notice after finding three more lead-tainted pieces of jewelry at Bay Area stores.</p><p>Long-term lead exposure can damage the nervous system in both children and adults. At high levels, the metal can severely damage the brain and kidneys and cause reproductive problems and even death. The Environmental Protection Agency says lead is a <a href="http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/PHS/PHS.asp?id=92&amp;tid=22" target="_blank">probable human carcinogen</a>.</p><p>Jewelry is not a leading source of lead exposure, and just touching jewelry that has lead on its surface is unlikely to be a health concern. But when swallowed or chewed on, lead can quickly spread through the bloodstream.</p><p>&ldquo;Don&rsquo;t they think they should stop selling it?&rdquo; asked Oakland resident Hareesha Dudley, 18. She said she previously had bought a necklace and bracelet at the Rainbow store in Oakland&rsquo;s Eastmont Town Center for her school prom. Both the attorney general&rsquo;s office and California Watch bought jewelry with high levels of lead at the same store.</p><p>Like many Rainbow customers, Dudley shops at the store at least once a month.</p><p>&ldquo;They should notify you to return it for credit &ndash; put signs up,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>But Rainbow never did. The store posted no signs, no notices &ndash; either near its jewelry displays or at its checkout counters.</p><p>Rainbow shops are stocked floor to ceiling with women&rsquo;s, juniors and plus-size clothes. School uniforms are sold alongside T-shirts and hooded jackets for children. Handbags hang from walls, and high-heeled shoes and sandals fill shelves as tall as customers. Colorful, densely packed clothing hangs under big red circles marked $2, $3, $5, $7.</p><p>Found in mostly working-class neighborhoods, many with predominantly black or Latino residents, the stores host steady streams of teenage girls and young families, often with toddlers in tow. Rainbow Apparel operates more than 1,100 stores in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, including <a href="http://californiawatch.org/data/map-rainbow-has-35-california-stores-impacted-lead-violation-notices" target="_blank">35 in California</a> under the names Rainbow and 5-7-9.</p><p>Rainbow would not say how much of the tainted jewelry was sold. And the company&rsquo;s legal counsel described high levels of lead in the retailer&rsquo;s jewelry as &ldquo;an isolated problem.&rdquo; Still, Jeffrey Margulies, an attorney at Fulbright &amp; Jaworski in Los Angeles who represents the retailer, added: &ldquo;They&rsquo;re thinking about not selling jewelry &ndash; they actually are.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Tougher restrictions</strong></p><p>California has one of the strictest laws governing lead in jewelry. Whereas federal law regulates only jewelry for children, who are more vulnerable to lead, California&rsquo;s limits extend to jewelry sold to adults.</p><p>Beginning in 2006, more than 200 vendors and retailers, including Rainbow, agreed to abide by the new <a href="http://ag.ca.gov/prop65/pdfs/amendedConsent.pdf" target="_blank">stricter standards as part of a settlement</a>. Many of the companies had been sued by the state and environmental groups for carrying products that contained high lead levels. The companies agreed to pay $2.6 million to establish a jewelry-testing fund.</p><p>The state <a href="http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/" target="_blank">Department of Toxic Substances Control</a> and the <a href="http://ag.ca.gov/" target="_blank">attorney general</a> oversee California&rsquo;s jewelry regulations. Most cases are handled by the attorney general&rsquo;s office, which is responsible for enforcing the settlement.</p><p>The attorney general&rsquo;s office has relied on the Oakland-based <a href="http://www.ceh.org/" target="_blank">Center for Environmental Health</a> to perform its initial lead tests. The nonprofit center screens about 30 jewelry items each week from all over California.</p><p>When the center finds high levels of lead, it sends the jewelry to an independent laboratory. If the results are confirmed, the state issues violation notices. The notices carry no fines, as long as the company agrees within 15 days to remove the items. However, there is no deadline for stores to take the products off the shelves. They must do so &ldquo;as soon as practicable,&rdquo; and the state rarely follows up to make sure that it happens.</p><p>&ldquo;Most companies, we send a notice and things do get better,&rdquo; said Deputy Attorney General Harrison Pollak. &ldquo;With Rainbow, it&rsquo;s been a little more difficult.&rdquo;</p><p>The state has measures in place to penalize repeat offenders, but only if they rack up enough violations involving the same suppliers within a short time. Under the regulations, even if a store had problems every week, but with different vendors, it would not be considered a repeat offender.</p><p>No company &ndash; not even Rainbow, whose 25 violations make it by far the state&rsquo;s worst offender &ndash; has amassed enough violations to warrant a fine.&nbsp;</p><p>Pollak said retailers incur other negative consequences, however.</p><p>&ldquo;There are costs associated with taking corrective action, including pulling noncompliant jewelry, and with adverse publicity,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><strong>Slipping through the cracks</strong></p><p>Although the Center for Environmental Health and the Department of Toxic Substances Control often spot-check stores, they do not ensure that every tainted item gets removed.</p><p>California Watch found that items can slip through the cracks.</p><p>After the state issued its most extensive warning in June, citing 16 items with high lead levels, Rainbow assured regulators that it had removed all the tainted jewelry. But that didn&rsquo;t happen.</p><p>One of the items cited in the state&rsquo;s violation notice, a pink heart-shaped pendant, was <a href="http://migration.kentucky.gov/Newsroom/ag/leadtaintedjewelry.htm" target="_blank">found by inspectors in a Rainbow store in Kentucky</a> &ndash; a day after the company&rsquo;s attorney said all the jewelry was off the shelves.</p><p>A day later, California Watch reporters bought the same pendant in Richmond. A lab test revealed the metal backing of the pendant was 23 percent lead.</p><p>&ldquo;They were pulled nationally,&rdquo; Margulies said. &ldquo;It shouldn&rsquo;t have been on the shelf.&rdquo;</p><p>Rainbow directed its stores by e-mail to remove the items and return them to its New York warehouse, said Margulies, adding that the retailer sent automated e-mails every day to stores that reported the products in their inventory.</p><p>Margulies said Rainbow has since voluntarily removed from across the country the six jewelry products that California Watch found contained unlawful levels of lead. One of those items was the subject of the state&rsquo;s most recent warning notice in September.</p><p>Neither Rainbow nor the attorney general&rsquo;s office would disclose how many units had been sold of the tainted jewelry. But in a letter to the attorney general&rsquo;s office, Margulies described the quantity as only a &ldquo;handful&rdquo; of each item. &nbsp;</p><p>The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission maintains an online list of children&rsquo;s jewelry it has <a href="http://cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prerel.html" target="_blank">recalled for lead</a>. The recalls typically involve the jewelry maker, said Scott Wolfson, an agency spokesman. But retailers that carried the item must display posters in their stores to inform customers, he said.</p><p>To date, none of those recalls have included jewelry at Rainbow, meaning the firm is under no obligation to warn customers.</p><p>Margulies said he didn&rsquo;t think a warning for the items would be necessary because &ldquo;there&rsquo;s no reason to believe that they are in any way dangerous to anybody.&rdquo;</p><p>The federal commission has contacted Rainbow about many of the items in the June violation notice, he said.</p><p>&ldquo;Rainbow is working with the California attorney general and (the commission), and if either determines that additional corrective action is needed, Rainbow will cooperate,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><strong>Child&rsquo;s death sparks recall, concerns</strong></p><p>Starting in 2004, customers who bought children&rsquo;s shoes with the Reebok label were treated to a special gift &ndash; a metal bracelet and a heart-shaped charm engraved with the brand name. In February 2006, 4-year-old Jarnell Brown <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm55d323a1.htm" target="_blank">swallowed the jewelry</a>.</p><p>Vomiting and complaints of a &ldquo;sore tummy&rdquo; landed Jarnell in a Minneapolis emergency room. His condition quickly worsened. Four days later, he was dead.</p><p>Tests revealed that the charm he swallowed was 99 percent lead. The toxic metal had stopped the flow of blood to his brain, doctors concluded.</p><p>Reebok <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml06/06119.html?elr=KArks:DCiUHc3E7_V_nDaycUiacyKUUr" target="_blank">recalled about 300,000 of the bracelets</a> and paid a <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml08/08224.html" target="_blank">$1 million civil fine</a>. Jarnell&rsquo;s death made lead in jewelry a national concern.</p><p>In 2008, the <a href="http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/sect101.html" target="_blank">Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act</a> set federal regulations for children&rsquo;s jewelry. Cases of lead in jewelry have been falling ever since.</p><p>&ldquo;The law made a big difference,&rdquo; said Charles Margulis, a spokesman for the Center for Environmental Health. By 2009, about 96 percent of <a href="http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/es903745b" target="_blank">jewelry tested by the center</a> complied with the law. By the end of next year, he said, &ldquo;I would be surprised if we were still finding violations like Rainbow.&rdquo;</p><p>Brent Cleaveland, executive director of the <a href="http://www.fjata.org/" target="_blank">Fashion Jewelry and Accessories Trade Association</a>, said the issue is being overblown.</p><p>&ldquo;We believe our products are safe,&rdquo; he said, adding that he has been in the jewelry industry for 40 years, handling raw materials like lead. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m a healthy man.&rdquo;</p><p>Cleaveland&rsquo;s group represents more than 225 manufacturers, suppliers and retailers, including Rainbow. He said jewelry makers like working with lead because it is less expensive and more pliable than other metals.</p><p>&ldquo;There is melanoma, but no one&rsquo;s outlawed the sun,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;Prudent, reasonable use of whatever product you&rsquo;re dealing with is warranted.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Murky accountability</strong></p><p>California requires a manufacturer or supplier to certify that jewelry complies with state law. But jewelry can change hands many times before reaching store shelves. And that can lead to a murky trail of accountability.</p><p>That is exactly what happened with the star-shaped pendant labeled both &ldquo;kids&rdquo; and &ldquo;lead free.&rdquo;</p><p>The pendants were imported from China by a New York firm that sold the items to a distributor, which eventually sold them to Rainbow. No one took responsibility for labeling the jewelry.</p><p>&ldquo;Rainbow did not label this product as lead free, or review or pre-approve the labeling of the product,&rdquo; Margulies, the retailer&rsquo;s attorney, said in his letter to the state. &ldquo;We had no reason to believe that there might be lead in the product.&rdquo;</p><p>When the pendants entered the country more than a year ago, the importer, Atlas Fashion Jewelry Corp., said the jewelry came with no labels. The company would not identify its overseas supplier. A salesman for Atlas, Kay Hu, said the company affixed stickers with the word &ldquo;adult&rdquo; and sold the jewelry to another New York vendor, Charming Accessory Unlimited Inc.</p><p>Charming&rsquo;s manager, Eric Huang, said he did not know if the jewelry arrived with labels. But he insisted that his company did not label the items<strong>,</strong> either. Huang said his firm obtained &ldquo;only like a few dozen&rdquo; of the pendants in either 2008 or 2009 and sold them soon after to Rainbow.</p><p>Somehow along the way, however, the &ldquo;adult&rdquo; label was replaced with &ldquo;kids&rdquo; and &ldquo;lead free.&rdquo;</p><p>The state bought and tested the star-shaped pendant this summer and found that the clasp was 80 percent lead.</p><p><strong>Notification process slow</strong></p><p>The importer of the lead-tainted pendants was one of the last to learn of a problem with the jewelry.</p><p>Atlas had not been alerted about any lead risks involving the pendant by either Rainbow or Charming, Hu said. Instead, the importer found out about the high lead results weeks later from federal inspectors.</p><p>California does not require that retailers track products beyond their immediate vendor. Nor does the state require that companies test jewelry. However, vendors must display a certification of compliance on jewelry shipments or packaging, or provide the certificate if requested.</p><p>But neither Charming nor Rainbow made such a request, Hu said.</p><p>Rainbow&rsquo;s contracts with its vendors state that products must comply with lead regulations.</p><p>&ldquo;Rainbow cannot shoulder the entire responsibility to ensure that the vendors supply only compliant product,&rdquo; Margulies said in his letter to the state. &ldquo;We are simply not sure what more Rainbow can reasonably be required to do under the circumstances.&rdquo;</p><p>Cleaveland, of the jewelry trade group, said many importers ask for certification before bringing jewelry into the country and voluntarily test the items once they arrive.</p><p>Rainbow does not routinely test the jewelry it orders, Margulies said. It has responded to each violation notice that it &ldquo;continues to share the attorney general&rsquo;s concern about lead in these products.&rdquo;</p><p>Margulies said the retailer is &ldquo;increasing its efforts&rdquo; to ensure that its vendors are aware of the lead limits their products must meet. But, he said, Rainbow is &ldquo;not dictating how they comply with the standards.&rdquo;</p><br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F4963&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 18:45:32 +0000 Joanna Lin Mandy Hofmockel 4963 at http://californiawatch.org GRAPHIC: The top six jewelry items with the highest lead levels http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/graphic-top-six-jewelry-items-highest-lead-levels-5037 <p class="image-full-width" style="width: 600px;"></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5037&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 18:08:03 +0000 Brian Cragin 5037 at http://californiawatch.org Testing jewelry for lead hazards http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/testing-jewelry-lead-hazards-5004 <p>The California attorney general&rsquo;s office has sent five violation notices to Rainbow Apparel for selling jewelry with high levels of lead. The retailer operates more than 1,100 stores in the United States, Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands, including 35 in California under the names Rainbow and 5-7-9.</p><p>After the fourth violation notice in June, California Watch bought 30 pieces of jewelry from five Bay Area Rainbow and 5-7-9 stores on July 2. The jewelry &ndash; necklaces, pendants, bracelets, rings and earrings &ndash; ranged in price from $1 to $9.99. Many of the tags said the items were made in China, and some were labeled as lead-free and for kids.</p><p>To determine how much lead was in the jewelry, each part of the item had to be tested. That meant separate tests for the chain, clasp or charm.</p><p>California Watch first had the items screened by the Center for Environmental Health, which regularly tests jewelry for lead using funds from the attorney general&rsquo;s settlement with the jewelry industry.</p><p>The center used an X-ray fluorescence analyzer to estimate lead levels in each jewelry component. Six pieces that registered high levels of lead were then sent to a separate laboratory in Hayward for analysis. Using Environmental Protection Agency methods 3050B and 7420, Forensic Analytical Laboratories confirmed high levels of lead in all six pieces. The laboratory found lead levels in components of the six jewelry items ranging from 0.1 percent to 25 percent lead by weight &ndash; all above the legal limit.</p><p>The results:</p><ul><li>A necklace with dangling tear-shaped charms had a lobster-claw clasp that was 16 percent lead. The necklace was sold with matching earrings and was labeled &ldquo;kids.&rdquo;</li><li>A silver heart-shaped pendant with black stripes had a lobster-claw clasp that was 16 percent lead.</li><li>A pink heart-shaped pendant encrusted with matching rhinestones had a metal backing that was 23 percent lead.&nbsp; The attorney general bought the same pendant and found its metal backing was 96 percent lead.</li><li>A pink<strong>-</strong>and<strong>-</strong>silver heart-shaped pendant bordered by rhinestones had a metal backing that was 24 percent lead.</li><li>A silver heart-shaped pendant had a backing that was 25 percent lead.</li><li>A black heart-shaped pendant was coated in paint that was 0.1 percent lead.</li></ul><p>California Watch notified Rainbow Apparel of the high lead results<strong>,</strong> and the retailer pledged to remove the items from its stores.</p><br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5004&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 18:07:24 +0000 Joanna Lin Mandy Hofmockel 5004 at http://californiawatch.org California Watch offers free testing to screen for lead in jewelry http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/california-watch-offers-free-testing-screen-lead-jewelry-5119 <p>Do you worry about that bracelet or necklace your young child is wearing? Do you worry more when that jewelry ends up in the mouth of your young toddler?</p><p>In connection with our <a href="http://californiawatch.org/lead-jewelry" target="_blank">project about lead levels in jewelry</a>, California Watch is holding screening events where parents and other concerned consumers can test jewelry items to determine whether they contain harmful levels of lead.</p><p>Items will be screened using an X-ray fluorescence device, the same type of equipment used by other organizations and government agencies to perform initial screenings for lead. To do this, we&#39;ve rented equipment from <a href="http://www.quickshotxrf.com/" target="_blank">Quickshot XRF</a>.</p><p>Screening these items is free to consumers. Each screening takes about a minute. You should have results on the spot. Jewelry items tested will not be damaged during the screening process.</p><p><strong>SCREENING LOCATIONS</strong></p><p>Wednesday, Oct. 6<br /> <strong>De Colores Head Start</strong> <strong>at Fruitvale Village</strong><br /> 1155 35th Ave., Oakland<br /> 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.<br /> <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;hs=nS4&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;q=1155+35th+Ave.+Oakland&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=1155+35th+Ave,+Oakland,+CA+94601&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=9DuhTIH4BI2-sQOw0fzAAQ&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=geocode_result&amp;ct=title&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CBgQ8gEwAA" target="_blank">Map</a><br /> &nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Sunday, Oct. 10<br /> <strong>Richmond Flea Market</strong><br /> 716 W. Gertrude Ave., Richmond<br /> 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.<br /> <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=716+W.+Gertrude+Ave.+Richmond&amp;oe=utf-8&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=716+W+Gertrude+Ave,+Richmond,+CA+94801&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=yzyhTIrjHpHksQPwrdiKAQ&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=geocode_result&amp;ct=title&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CBcQ8gEwAA" target="_blank">Map</a></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Thursday, Oct. 14<br /> <strong>Nahui Ohlin</strong><br /> 1511 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles<br /> Noon to 6 p.m.<br /> <a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=1511+W.+Sunset+Blvd.+Echo+Park&amp;oe=utf-8&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;hq=&amp;hnear=1511+W+Sunset+Blvd,+Los+Angeles,+CA+90026&amp;gl=us&amp;ei=BHKjTMuEDouosAOfy4X6Bg&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=geocode_result&amp;ct=title&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0CBMQ8gEwAA">Map</a></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5119&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 18:06:54 +0000 Ashley Alvarado 5119 at http://californiawatch.org Rainbow's history of violations http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/rainbows-history-violations-5005 <p>Each violation notice from the California attorney general&#39;s office and response from Rainbow Apparel is included below as a PDF.</p><p><strong>May 2009:</strong> The state attorney general&rsquo;s office notifies Rainbow Apparel that its Emeryville Rainbow and Richmond 5-7-9 stores are selling jewelry that violates California&rsquo;s lead standards. The state tests four of the same necklace and finds their clasps contain 16 to 43 percent lead. A pair of earrings tests at 43 percent lead. The clasp of a necklace is 45 percent lead.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>October 2009:</strong> The attorney general&rsquo;s office issues a violation notice after an Oakland Rainbow store is found selling a pair of black faux-leather hoop earrings that exceed lead limits.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>January 2010:</strong> The attorney general&rsquo;s office issues a violation notice aimed at Rainbow for two items bought from a Richmond Rainbow store. Two necklaces are found with clasps that register 85 percent lead or more. Both were labeled &ldquo;kids.&rdquo;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p style="padding-left: 220px;"><strong>June 2010:</strong> The attorney general&rsquo;s office sends its most sweeping violation notice to date, finding that 16 jewelry items bought at Rainbow stores exceed state lead limits. Most of the items register from 80 to 97 percent lead. Three of the toxic pieces of jewelry are labeled &ldquo;kids.&rdquo; One is labeled &ldquo;lead free.&rdquo; Most of the jewelry comes from a Rainbow in Richmond, but some items come from a Richmond 5-7-9, an Oakland Rainbow and an Emeryville Rainbow. Attorney General Jerry Brown requests a meeting with Rainbow officials. To date, no meeting has been set.</p><p><strong>September 2010: </strong>The attorney general&rsquo;s office sends a fifth violation notice after finding lead in three necklaces at Rainbow stores in Oakland and Emeryville. The clasps on the necklaces range from 59 to 71 percent lead. California Watch had bought one of the same necklaces in July, tested it and found the clasp was 16 percent lead.</p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5005&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 17:42:54 +0000 Mandy Hofmockel Joanna Lin 5005 at http://californiawatch.org SLIDE SHOW: Results of 30 items tested by California Watch http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/slide-show-results-30-items-tested-california-watch-5055 <p>California Watch reporters bought 30 jewelry items at five Rainbow and 5-7-9 stores in the Bay Area. The jewelry was screened by the Center for Environmental Health. Items found with high levels of lead were then sent to Forensic Analytical in Hayward for analysis. Here are the results for all 30 items.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><object classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" height="408" id="soundslider" width="500"><param name="movie" value="http://californiawatch.org/files/data/lead/CWslideshow/soundslider.swf?size=2&amp;format=xml" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="menu" value="false" /><param name="bgcolor" value="#000000" /><embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="sameDomain" bgcolor="#000000" height="408" menu="false" quality="high" src="http://californiawatch.org/files/data/lead/CWslideshow/soundslider.swf?size=2&amp;format=xml" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="500"></embed></object></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5055&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 16:58:46 +0000 Mandy Hofmockel 5055 at http://californiawatch.org SLIDE SHOW: Attorney general's office finds high levels of lead http://californiawatch.org/health-and-welfare/slide-show-attorney-generals-office-finds-high-levels-lead-5138 <p>The California attorney general&#39;s office has sent Rainbow Apparel five violation notices over 16 months for selling lead-tainted jewelry. The violations included 25 jewelry items sold at the retailer&#39;s Rainbow and 5-7-9 stores. Most of the items are represented in the slide show.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><object classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" height="408" id="soundslider" width="500"><param name="movie" value="http://californiawatch.org/files/data/lead/AGslideshow/soundslider.swf?size=2&amp;format=xml" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="menu" value="false" /><param name="bgcolor" value="#000000" /><embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="sameDomain" bgcolor="#000000" height="408" menu="false" quality="high" src="http://californiawatch.org/files/data/lead/AGslideshow/soundslider.swf?size=2&amp;format=xml" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="500"></embed></object></p><br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F5138&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead Rainbow Apparel Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 16:58:10 +0000 Mandy Hofmockel 5138 at http://californiawatch.org Rainbow has 35 California stores impacted by lead violation notices (map) http://californiawatch.org/data/rainbow-has-35-california-stores-impacted-lead-violation-notices-map <p>The attorney general has issued five violation notices against Rainbow Apparel stores and its 5-7-9 locations in California for repeatedly selling jewelry with lead levels that exceed legal limits. The items were purchased at five Bay Area locations. But the violation notices have applied to all 35 retail outlets, mapped below, across the state.</p><p><iframe border="0" height="1000px;" scrolling="no" src="/files/data/map/rainbow_map_for_pub.html" width="940px;"></iframe></p> <br /> <br /> <p>&nbsp;</p><div><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" src="http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http%3A%2F%2Fcaliforniawatch.org%2Fnode%2F4922&amp;layout=standard&amp;show_faces=true&amp;width=450&amp;action=recommend&amp;colorscheme=light&amp;height=80" style="border: medium none; overflow: hidden; width: 400px; height: 80px;"></iframe><script type="text/javascript"> tweetmeme_source = 'californiawatch'; </script><script type="text/javascript" src="http://tweetmeme.com/i/scripts/button.js"></script></div> Health and Welfare attorney general jewelry lead map Rainbow Apparel Interactive Map Tainted Jewelry Sat, 02 Oct 2010 16:01:36 +0000 4922 at http://californiawatch.org